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Amreekiya: A Novel

by Lena Mahmoud

Isra Shadi, a twenty-one-year-old woman of mixed Palestinian and white descent, lives in California with her paternal amu (uncle), amtu (aunt), and cousins after the death of her mother and abandonment by her father at a young age.

The Struggle for Cooperation: Liberated France and the American Military, 1944–1946

by Robert L. Fuller

During World War II, French citizens expressed that the German occupiers behaved more “correctly” than the American combat troops who replaced them.

Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship

by David P. Oakley

Since September 11, 2001, the CIA and DoD have operated together in Afghanistan, Iraq, and during counterterrorism operations.

Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men: A Reader's Companion

by Jonathan S. Cullick

Robert Penn Warren is one of the best-known and most consequential Kentucky writers of the twentieth century and the only American writer to have won three Pulitzers in two different genres.

Pershing's Tankers: Personal Accounts of the AEF Tank Corps in World War I

edited by Lawrence M. Kaplan foreword by Dale E. Wilson

After the United States declared war against Germany in April 1917, the US Army established the Tank Corps to help break the deadlock of trench warfare in France during World War I. The army envisioned having a large tank force by 1919, but when the war ended in November 1918, only three tank battalions had participated in combat operations.

Elkhorn: Evolution of a Kentucky Landscape

by Richard Taylor

When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as “Taylor’s Folly.

Jarmila Novotná: My Life in Song

by Jarmila Novotná edited by William V. Madison foreword by Brian Kellow

A legendary beauty, hailed as one of the greatest singing actors of her time, Jarmila Novotná (1907–1994) was an internationally known opera soprano from the former Czechoslovakia.

War in the American Pacific and East Asia, 1941-1972

edited by Hal M. Friedman with contributions by Rebecca Robbins Raines, Steven C. Call, Stephen Houseknecht, Josh Levy, Katherine Reist, Nicholas E. Sarantakes, Sarandis Papadopoulos, and David Ulbrich

Before 1940, the Japanese empire stood as the greatest single threat to the American presence in the Pacific and East Asia.

Mend: Poems

by Kwoya Fagin Maples

The inventor of the speculum, J. Marion Sims, is celebrated as the “father of modern gynecology,” and a memorial at his birthplace honors “his service to suffering women, empress and slave alike.

The Struggle Is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation

by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson.

Virtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry’s Sustainable Forms

by Jeffrey Bilbro

For over fifty years, Wendell Berry has argued that our most pressing ecological and cultural need is a renewed formal intelligence—a mode of thinking and acting that fosters the health of the earth and its beings.

The Cold War at Home and Abroad: Domestic Politics and US Foreign Policy since 1945

edited by Andrew L. Johns and Mitchell B. Lerner with contributions by Andrew L. Johns, Autumn Lass, David L. Prentice, Christopher Foss, Daniel G. Hummel, Henry Maar, Tizoc Chavez, Hideaki Kami, Amanda C. Demmer, Rasmus Sinding Søndergaard, Michael Brenes, Simon Miles, and Mitchell B. Lerner

From President Truman’s use of a domestic propaganda agency to Ronald Reagan’s handling of the Soviet Union during his 1984 reelection campaign, the American political system has consistently exerted a profound effect on the country’s foreign policies.

Black Bone: 25 Years of the Affrilachian Poets

edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden

The Appalachian region stretches from Mississippi to New York, encompassing rural areas as well as cities from Birmingham to Pittsburgh.

North Korean Military Proliferation in the Middle East and Africa: Enabling Violence and Instability

by Bruce E. Bechtol Jr.

North Korea has posed a threat to stability in Northeast Asia for decades.

The Forgotten Front: The Eastern Theater of World War I, 1914 - 1915

edited by Gerhard P. Gross translated by Janice W. Ancker with contributions by Gerhard P. Gross, Hew Strachan, Stig Förster, Gerhard P. Gross, Boris Khavkin, Günther Kronenbitter, Jörg Baberowski, Piotr Szlanta, Hubertus F. Jahn, Peter Hoeres, Eva Horn, Birgit Menzel, Igor Narskij, Hans-Erich Volkmann, Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, Ranier Rother, Christine Beil, Kristiane Janeke, Ranier Rother, Gundula Bavendamm, and Rüdiger Bergien

Although much has been written about the Western Front in World War I, little attention has been given to developments in the east, especially during the crucial period of 1914–1915. Not only did these events have a significant impact on the fighting and outcome of the battles in the west, but all the major combatants in the east ultimately suffered collapses of their political systems with enormous consequences for the future events.

A Guide to Cyanobacteria: Identification and Impact

by Mark A. Nienaber and Miriam Steinitz-Kannan

Blue-green algae (also known as cyanobacteria) and the toxins they can produce pose serious economic, environmental, and public health problems worldwide.

Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine

by Kelley Fanto Deetz

In grocery store aisles and kitchens across the country, smiling images of “Aunt Jemima” and other historical and fictional black cooks can be found on various food products and in advertising.

Southern History on Screen: Race and Rights, 1976-2016

edited by Bryan M. Jack with contributions by Oliver Gruner, Daniel Farrell, Erik Alexander, Caroline Schroeter, Todd Simpson, Kwakiutl Dreher, Megan Hunt, Gene Kelly, and Tatiana Prorokova

Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach mass audiences, films represent the power to influence and shape the public’s understanding of our country’s past, creating lasting images—both real and imagined—in American culture.

Imaginative Conservatism: The Letters of Russell Kirk

edited by James E. Person Jr.

Russell Kirk (1918–1994) is renowned worldwide as one of the founders of postwar American conservatism.

Paving the Way for Reagan: The Influence of Conservative Media on US Foreign Policy

by Laurence R. Jurdem

From 1964 to 1980, the United States was buffeted by a variety of international crises, including the nation’s defeat in Vietnam, the growing aggression of the Soviet Union, and Washington’s inability to free the fifty two American hostages held by Islamic extremists in Iran.

Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods, revised edition

by Aimee Zaring

Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands.

Appalachia in Regional Context: Place Matters

edited by Dwight B. Billings and Ann E. Kingsolver with contributions by Barbara Ellen Smith, John Pickles, John Gaventa, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Carol A. Mason, Mary L. Gray, bell hooks, Rich Kirby, John Haywood, Ron Pen, Gina Caison, David A. Davis, Laura Hernandez-Ehrisman, Kent C. Ryden, and Emily Satterwhite

In an increasingly globalized world, place matters more than ever.

Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader

by Bobbie Ann Mason Introduction by George Saunders

Bobbie Ann Mason burst onto the American literary scene during a renaissance of short fiction that Raymond Carver called a “literary phenomenon.

A Girl's A Gun: Poems

by Rachel Danielle Peterson

Haunting and candid, A Girl’s A Gun introduces a poet whose bold voice merges heightened lyricism with compelling narrative.

Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.