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A Woman's Wage: Historical Meanings and Social Consequences, updated edition

by Alice Kessler-Harris

In this updated edition of a pathbreaking classic, Alice Kessler-Harris explores the meanings of women’s wages in the United States in the twentieth and twenty first centuries, focusing on three issues that capture the transformation of women’s roles: the battle over minimum wage for women, which exposes the relationship between family ideology and workplace demands; the argument concerning equal pay for equal work, which challenges gendered patterns of self-esteem and social organization; and the debate over comparable worth, which seeks to incorporate traditionally female values into new work and family trajectories.

Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force

by Robert M. Farley

The United States needs airpower, but does it need an air force?

Diary of a Southern Refugee during the War, annotated edition

by Judith Brockenbrough McGuire edited by James I. Robertson Jr.

Judith Brockenbrough McGuire’s Diary of a Southern Refugee during the War is among the first of such works published after the Civil War.

So Much to Lose: John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos

by William J. Rust

Before U.S. combat units were deployed to Vietnam, presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy strove to defeat a communist-led insurgency in Laos.

Duncan Hines: How a Traveling Salesman Became the Most Trusted Name in Food

by Louis Hatchett foreword by Michael and Jane Stern

Duncan Hines (1880–1959) may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand.

The Dessert Book

by Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett foreword by Michael and Jane Stern

Kentucky native and national tastemaker Duncan Hines (1880–1959) published his first cookbook, Adventures in Good Cooking, in 1939 at the age of 59. This best-selling collection featured recipes from select restaurants across the country as well as crowd-pleasing family favorites, and it helped to raise the standard for home cooking in America.

Adventures in Good Cooking

Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett foreword by Michael and Jane Stern

Kentucky native and national tastemaker Duncan Hines (1880–1959) published his first cookbook, Adventures in Good Cooking, in 1939 at the age of fifty-nine. This best-selling collection featured recipes from select restaurants across the country as well as crowd-pleasing family favorites, and it helped to raise the standard for home cooking in America.

Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master

by Michael Sragow

Best remembered for the iconic classics Gone with the Wind (1939) and The Wizard of Oz (1939) to the silver screen, Victor Fleming also counted successful films such as Red Dust (1932), Captains Courageous (1937), Test Pilot (1939), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), and the groundbreaking Joan of Arc (1948) among his more than forty directing credits.

Team 19 in Vietnam: An Australian Soldier at War

by David Millie foreword by General Gordon R. Sullivan, USA (Ret.)

Historical accounts and memoirs of the Vietnam War often ignore the participation of nations other than Vietnam and the United States.

The Land We Dreamed: Poems

by Joe Survant

Weaving together universal themes of family, geography, and death with images of America’s frontier landscape, former Kentucky Poet Laureate Joe Survant has been lauded for his ability to capture the spirit of the land and its people.

The Founders: The Origins of the ANC and the Struggle for Democracy in South Africa

by André Odendaal

Founded in1912, the African National Congress worked tirelessly to promote democracy and protect the rights of South Africa’s black population.

Alvin York: A New Biography of the Hero of the Argonne

by Douglas V. Mastriano

Alvin C. York (1887–1964)—devout Christian, conscientious objector, and reluctant hero of World War I—is one of America’s most famous and celebrated soldiers.

De Bow’s Review: The Antebellum Vision of a New South

by John F. Kvach

In the decades preceding the Civil War, the South struggled against widespread negative characterizations of its economy and society as it worked to match the North’s infrastructure and level of development.

The Graves County Boys: A Tale of Kentucky Basketball, Perseverance, and the Unlikely Championship of the Cuba Cubs

by Marianne Walker foreword by Joe B. Hall

In 1952, just one year after Coach Adolph Rupp’s University of Kentucky Wildcats won their third national championship in four years, an unlikely high school basketball team from rural Graves County, Kentucky, stole the spotlight and the media’s attention.

The Currents of War: A New History of American-Japanese Relations, 1899-1941

by Sidney Pash

From 1899 until the American entry into World War II, U.S. presidents sought to preserve China’s territorial integrity in order to guarantee American businesses access to Chinese markets—a policy famously known as the “open door.

River of Hope: Black Politics and the Memphis Freedom Movement, 1865–1954

by Elizabeth Gritter

One of the largest southern cities and a hub for the cotton industry, Memphis, Tennessee, was at the forefront of black political empowerment during the Jim Crow era.

Kentucky Hauntings: Homespun Ghost Stories and Unexplained History

by Roberta Simpson Brown and Lonnie E. Brown

More than evoking chills down the spine and cautious glances over one’s shoulder, spooky stories create lasting bonds and memories between friends and family.

Selma to Saigon: The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War

by Daniel S. Lucks

The civil rights and anti–Vietnam War movements were the two greatest protests of twentieth-century America.

Kentucky Marine: Major General Logan Feland and the Making of the Modern USMC

by David J. Bettez

A native of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, Major General Logan Feland (1869–1936) played a major role in the development of the modern Marine Corps.

Hawks on Hawks

by Joseph McBride

"I read Hawks on Hawks with passion.

Intrepid Laughter: Preston Sturges and the Movies

by Andrew Dickos

Throughout his career, Preston Sturges (1898–1959) was known for bringing sophistication and wit to the genre of comedy, establishing himself as one of the most valuable writer-directors in 1940s Hollywood.

The Old Fashioned: An Essential Guide to the Original Whiskey Cocktail

by Albert W. A. Schmid foreword by John Peter Laloganes

American tavern owners caused a sensation in the late eighteenth century when they mixed sugar, water, bitters, and whiskey and served the drink with rooster feather stirrers.

William Wyler: The Life and Films of Hollywood’s Most Celebrated Director

by Gabriel Miller

During his forty-five-year career, William Wyler (1902–1981) pushed the boundaries of filmmaking with his gripping storylines and innovative depth-of-field cinematography.

Pola Negri: Hollywood's First Femme Fatale

by Mariusz Kotowski

Pola Negri (1897–1987) rose from an impoverished childhood in Warsaw, Poland, to become one of early Hollywood’s greatest stars.

Twilight of the Republic: Empire and Exceptionalism in the American Political Tradition

by Justin B. Litke

The uniqueness of America has been alternately celebrated and panned, emphasized and denied, for most of the country’s history—both by its own people and by visitors and observers from around the world.