Titles in the selected series

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Reagan and the World: Leadership and National Security, 1981–1989

edited by Bradley Lynn Coleman and Kyle Longley foreword by Jack Matlock Jr., James Graham Wilson, Beth Fischer, Ronald Granieri, James R. Locher III, Archie Brown, James Cooper, William Hitchcock, David F. Patton, Michael Schaller, Kyle Longley, Evan R. Ward, Charles BrowerIV, and Ryan Carpenter

Throughout his presidency, Ronald Reagan sought “peace through strength” during an era of historic change.

US Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton

edited by Andrew Johnstone and Andrew Priest with contributions by Andrew Johnstone, Andrew Priest, J. Simon Rofe, Michael F. Hopkins, Steven Casey, Scott Lucas, Sylvia Ellis, Thomas Tunstall Allcock, Sandra Scanlon, Thomas Alan Schwartz, Andrew Priest, Robert Mason, David Ryan, Robert A. Strong, John Dumbrell, and Robert David Johnson

While domestic issues loom large in voters’ minds during American presidential elections, matters of foreign policy have consistently shaped candidates and their campaigns.

Nixon’s Back Channel to Moscow: Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

by Richard A. Moss foreword by Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

Most Americans consider détente—the reduction of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union—to be among the Nixon administration’s most significant foreign policy successes.

Foreign Policy at the Periphery: The Shifting Margins of US International Relations since World War II

edited by Bevan Sewell and Maria Ryan

As American interests assumed global proportions after 1945, policy makers were faced with the challenge of prioritizing various regions and determining the extent to which the United States was prepared to defend and support them.

Aid Under Fire: Nation Building and the Vietnam War

by Jessica Elkind

In the aftermath of World War II, as longstanding empires collapsed and former colonies struggled for independence, the United States employed new diplomatic tools to counter unprecedented challenges to its interests across the globe.

Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action, and the Origins of the Second Indochina War

by William J. Rust

Although most Americans paid little attention to Cambodia during Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency, the nation’s proximity to China and the global ideological struggle with the Soviet Union guaranteed US vigilance throughout Southeast Asia.

Enemies to Allies: Cold War Germany and American Memory

by Brian C. Etheridge

At the close of World War II, the United States went from being allied with the Soviet Union against Germany to alignment with the Germans against the Soviet Union—almost overnight.

American Justice in Taiwan: The 1957 Riots and Cold War Foreign Policy

by Stephen G. Craft

On May 23, 1957, US Army Sergeant Robert Reynolds was acquitted of murdering Chinese officer Liu Ziran in Taiwan.

Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America’s First Undeclared War

by Larry Blomstedt

Three days after North Korean premier Kim Il Sung launched a massive military invasion of South Korea on June 24, 1950, President Harry S. Truman responded, dispatching air and naval support to South Korea.

Obama at War: Congress and the Imperial Presidency

by Ryan C. Hendrickson

During President Barack Obama’s first term in office, the United States expanded its military presence in Afghanistan and increased drone missile strikes across Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia.

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie

by Joseph A. Fry

To fully comprehend the Vietnam War, it is essential to understand the central role that southerners played in the nation’s commitment to the war, in the conflict’s duration, and in the fighting itself.

Lincoln Gordon: Architect of Cold War Foreign Policy

by Bruce L. R. Smith

After World War II, American statesman and scholar Lincoln Gordon emerged as one of the key players in the reconstruction of Europe.

The Conversion of Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg: From Isolation to International Engagement

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

The United States has looked inward throughout most of its history, preferring to avoid “foreign entanglements,” as George Washington famously advised.

Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force

by Robert M. Farley

The United States needs airpower, but does it need an air force?

Diplomatic Games: Sport, Statecraft, and International Relations since 1945

edited by Heather L. Dichter and Andrew L. Johns with contributions byAndrew L. Johns, Heather L. Dichter, Evelyn Mertin, Jenifer Parks, Aviston D. Downes, Cesar R. Torres, Pascal Charitas, Antonio Sotomayor, John Soares, Kevin B. Witherspoon, Nicholas E. Sarantakes, Wanda Ellen Wakefield, Fan Hong, Lu Zhouxiang, Scott Laderman, and Thomas W. Zeiler

International sporting events, including the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup, have experienced profound growth in popularity and significance since the mid-twentieth century.

So Much to Lose: John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos

by William J. Rust

Before U.S. combat units were deployed to Vietnam, presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy strove to defeat a communist-led insurgency in Laos.

Nothing Less Than War: A New History of America’s Entry into World War I

by Justus D. Doenecke

When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany.

The Currents of War: A New History of American-Japanese Relations, 1899-1941

by Sidney Pash

From 1899 until the American entry into World War II, U.S. presidents sought to preserve China’s territorial integrity in order to guarantee American businesses access to Chinese markets—a policy famously known as the “open door.

The Gulf: The Bush Presidencies and the Middle East

by Michael F. Cairo

Presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush both led the United States through watershed events in foreign relations: the end of the Cold War and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans

by James W. Pardew

The wars that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s were the deadliest European conflicts since World War II. The violence escalated to the point of genocide when, over the course of ten days in July 1995, Serbian troops under the command of General Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 unarmed men and boys who had sought refuge at a UN safe-haven in Srebrenica.