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The Cold War at Home and Abroad: Domestic Politics and US Foreign Policy since 1945

edited by Andrew L. Johns and Mitchell B. Lerner with contributions by Andrew L. Johns, Autumn Lass, David L. Prentice, Christopher Foss, Daniel G. Hummel, Henry Maar, Tizoc Chavez, Hideaki Kami, Amanda C. Demmer, Rasmus Sinding Søndergaard, Michael Brenes, Simon Miles, and Mitchell B. Lerner

From President Truman’s use of a domestic propaganda agency to Ronald Reagan’s handling of the Soviet Union during his 1984 reelection campaign, the American political system has consistently exerted a profound effect on the country’s foreign policies.

Paving the Way for Reagan: The Influence of Conservative Media on US Foreign Policy

by Laurence R. Jurdem

From 1964 to 1980, the United States was buffeted by a variety of international crises, including the nation’s defeat in Vietnam, the growing aggression of the Soviet Union, and Washington’s inability to free the fifty two American hostages held by Islamic extremists in Iran.

Nixon’s Back Channel to Moscow: Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

by Richard A. Moss foreword by Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

Most Americans consider détente—the reduction of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union—to be among the Nixon administration’s most significant foreign policy successes.

Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America’s First Undeclared War

by Larry Blomstedt

Three days after North Korean premier Kim Il Sung launched a massive military invasion of South Korea on June 24, 1950, President Harry S. Truman responded, dispatching air and naval support to South Korea.

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie

by Joseph A. Fry

To fully comprehend the Vietnam War, it is essential to understand the central role that southerners played in the nation’s commitment to the war, in the conflict’s duration, and in the fighting itself.