Titles in the selected subject

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Paul Rusch in Postwar Japan: Evangelism, Rural Development, and the Battle against Communism

by Andrew T. McDonald and Verlaine Stoner McDonald

Paul Rusch first traveled from Louisville, Kentucky, to Tokyo in 1925 to help rebuild YMCA facilities in the wake of the Great Kanto earthquake.

A New History of Kentucky, second edition

by James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state.

Elkhorn: Evolution of a Kentucky Landscape

by Richard Taylor

When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as “Taylor’s Folly.

The Mentelles: Mary Todd Lincoln, Henry Clay, and the Immigrant Family Who Educated Antebellum Kentucky

by Randolph Paul Runyon

Though they were not, as Charlotte claimed, refugees from the French Revolution, Augustus Waldemar and Charlotte Victoire Mentelle undoubtedly felt like exiles in their adopted hometown of Lexington, Kentucky—a settlement that was still a frontier town when they arrived in 1798.

Kentucky's Last Cavalier: General William Preston, 1816-1887

by Peter J. Sehlinger

William Preston was a leading representative of Kentucky’s slaveholding, landed gentry, the group who dominated economic, political, and social life in the commonwealth before the Civil War.