Titles in the selected subject

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The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable

by Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier edited by Carolyn Woodward

Before Jane Austen’s novels explored heroines in English society, writers Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier dared to provide commentary on gender and education through self-conscious narratives.

King Lear and the Gods

by William R. Elton

Many critics hold that Shakespeare’s King Lear is primarily a drama of meaningful suffering and redemption within a just universe ruled by providential higher powers.

Loving Arms: British Women Writing the Second World War

by Karen Schneider

Loving Arms examines the war-related writings of five British women whose works explore the connections among gender, war, and story-telling. While not the first study to relate the subjects of gender and war, it is the first within a growing body of criticism to focus specifically on British culture during and after World War II. Evoking the famous "St. Crispin's Day" speech from Henry V and then her own father's account of being moved to tears on V-J Day because he had been too young to fight, Karen Schneider posits that the war story has a far-reaching potency.

The Re-Imagined Text: Shakespeare, Adaptation, and Eighteenth-Century Literary Theory

by Jean L. Marsden

Shakespeare's plays were not always the inviolable texts they are almost universally considered to be today.

Worldmaking Spenser: Explorations in the Early Modern Age

edited by Patrick Cheney and Lauren Silberman

Worldmaking Spenser reexamines the role of Spenser's work in English history and highlights the richness and complexity of his understanding of place.