Titles in the selected subject

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World Politics on Screen: Understanding International Relations through Popular Culture

by Mark Sachleben

Increasingly resistant to lessons on international politics, society often turns to television and film to engage the subject.

Paving the Way for Reagan: The Influence of Conservative Media on US Foreign Policy

by Laurence R. Jurdem

From 1964 to 1980, the United States was buffeted by a variety of international crises, including the nation’s defeat in Vietnam, the growing aggression of the Soviet Union, and Washington’s inability to free the fifty two American hostages held by Islamic extremists in Iran.

Hollywood Presents Jules Verne: The Father of Science Fiction on Screen

by Brian Taves

Even for those who have never read Jules Verne (1828–1905), the author’s very name conjures visions of the submarine in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, the epic race in Around the World in Eighty Days, the spacecraft in From the Earth to the Moon, and the daring descent in Journey to the Center of the Earth.

Lum and Abner: Rural America and the Golden Age of Radio

by Randal L. Hall

In the 1930s radio stations filled the airwaves with programs and musical performances about rural Americans—farmers and small-town residents struggling through the Great Depression.

Vampire Legends in Contemporary American Culture: What Becomes a Legend Most

by William Patrick Day

While vampire stories have been part of popular culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century, it has been in recent decades that they have become a central part of American culture.