Holiday Sale

Use discount code FHOL to receive discounts
through January 31, 2018.


Sale prices will appear at final checkout.


Place orders by December 1, 2017 to ensure holiday delivery.

Items per page: | Showing 1-100 of 1893 | Show by discount: All, 20%, 50%
Prev | Next »

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

Harold Stassen: Eisenhower, the Cold War, and the Pursuit of Nuclear Disarmament

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

Harold Stassen (1907–2001) garnered accolades as the thirty-one-year-old “boy wonder” governor of Minnesota and quickly assumed a national role as aide to Admiral William Halsey Jr. during World War II. When Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected in 1952, Stassen was named director of the Mutual Security Administration and then became the president’s special assistant for disarmament.

Kentucky’s Rebel Press: Pro-Confederate Media and the Secession Crisis

by Berry Craig

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky.

The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable

by Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier edited by Carolyn Woodward

Before Jane Austen’s novels explored heroines in English society, writers Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier dared to provide commentary on gender and education through self-conscious narratives.

Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans

by James W. Pardew

The wars that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s were the deadliest European conflicts since World War II. The violence escalated to the point of genocide when, over the course of ten days in July 1995, Serbian troops under the command of General Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 unarmed men and boys who had sought refuge at a UN safe-haven in Srebrenica.

Make Way for Her: And Other Stories

by Katie Cortese

A girl afflicted with pyrokinesis tries to control her fire-starting long enough to go to a dance with a boy she likes.

Forty Minutes to Glory: Inside the Kentucky Wildcats’ 1978 Championship Season

by Doug Brunk forewords by Larry Vaught and Tom Leach featuring chapters by Jack Givens, Joe B. Hall, and others

“Winning a national title . . . winning it at Kentucky?

Black Bone: 25 Years of the Affrilachian Poets

edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden

The Appalachian region stretches from Mississippi to New York, encompassing rural areas as well as cities from Birmingham to Pittsburgh.

Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.

Power versus Law in Modern China: Cities, Courts, and the Communist Party

by Qiang Fang and Xiaobing Li

Today 700 million Chinese citizens—more than fifty-four percent of the population—live in cities.

A Political Companion to James Baldwin

edited by Susan J. McWilliams with contributions by Susan J. McWilliams, Lawrie Balfour, P.J. Brendese, Susan J. McWilliams, Nicholas Buccola, George Shulman, Vincent Lloyd, Wilson Carey McWilliams, Joel Schlosser, Brian Norman, Ulf Schulenberg, Jack Turner, Lisa Beard, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Rachel Brahinsky

In seminal works such as Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, and The Fire Next Time, acclaimed author and social critic James Baldwin (1924–1987) expresses his profound belief that writers have the power to transform society, to engage the public, and to inspire and channel conversation to achieve lasting change.

The Art of Command: Military Leadership from George Washington to Colin Powell, second edition

edited by Harry S. Laver and Jeffrey J. Matthews foreword by H.R. McMaster

What essential leadership lessons do we learn by distilling the actions and ideas of great military commanders such as George Washington, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Colin Powell?

Barbara La Marr: The Girl Who Was Too Beautiful for Hollywood

by Sherri Snyder

Barbara La Marr’s (1896–1926) publicist once confessed: “There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr.

Dying to Eat: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Food, Death, and the Afterlife

edited by Candi K. Cann with contributions by Emily Wu, Jung Eun Sophia Park, Joshua Graham, Lacy K. Crocker, Gordon Fuller, David Oualaalou, Christa Shusko, and Radikobo Ntsimane

Food has played a major role in funerary and memorial practices since the dawn of the human race.

Water in Kentucky: Natural History, Communities, and Conservation

edited by Brian D. Lee, Daniel I. Carey, and Alice L. Jones with contributions by Tricia Coakley, Jeffrey W. Stringer, Emma Whitt, Jamey Wiglesworth, Demetrio P. Zourarakis, Carol Wilson, Tanja N. Williamson, Kelly Taylor, Shaunna L. Scott, Jack Schieffer, Roger Recktenwald, Gary O'Dell, Zina Merkin, Stephanie McSpirit, Wuyang Hu, Carol Hanley, Jason Hale, Susan P. Hendricks, Amanda A. Gumbert, Michelle L. Guidugli, James C. Currens, Angela S. Crain, John R. Burch Jr., David R. Brown, Christopher D. Barton, Carmen T. Agouridis, Sam Adams, Brad D. Lee, and Stephen C. Richter

Home to sprawling Appalachian forests, rolling prairies, and the longest cave system in the world, Kentucky is among the most ecologically diverse states in the nation.

Kentucky's Last Cavalier: General William Preston, 1816-1887

by Peter J. Sehlinger

William Preston was a leading representative of Kentucky’s slaveholding, landed gentry, the group who dominated economic, political, and social life in the commonwealth before the Civil War.

A History of Blacks in Kentucky: From Slavery to Segregation, 1760-1891, Volume 1

by Marion B. Lucas

A History of Blacks in Kentucky traces the role of blacks from the early exploration and settlement of Kentucky to 1891, when African Americans gained freedom only to be faced with a segregated society.

Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox, 1900-1950

by James C. Klotter

This volume is the first comprehensive and in-depth history of Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century.

Roadside History: A Guide to Kentucky Highway Markers

edited by Melba Porter Hay and Thomas H. Appleton, Jr.

Published by the Kentucky Historical Society and distributed by the University Press of Kentucky We have all spied them as we blast down I-75 scanning the roadside for anything of interest or rolled past one while trying to find an elusive gas station in an unfamiliar small town.

Community Memories: A Glimpse of African American Life in Frankfort, Kentucky

by Winona L. Fletcher, Sheila Mason Burton, James E. Wallace, and Douglas A. Boyd

Community Memories is a fascinating look into life recalled by African Americans who consider Frankfort their home.

Footloose in Jacksonian America: Robert W. Scott and his Agrarian World

by Thomas D. Clark

In the fall of 1829, young Robert Wilmot Scott rode away from Frankfort, Kentucky, on a trip that would take him through nine states.

A History of Blacks in Kentucky: In Pursuit of Equality, 1890-1980, Volume 2

by George C Wright

Published by the Kentucky Historical Society & Distributed by the University Press of Kentucky This is the second part of a two-volume study which covers the entire spectrum of the black experience in Kentucky from earliest exploration and settlement to 1980.

Kentucky: Decades of Discord, 1865-1900

by Hambleton Tapp and James C. Klotter

" Published by the Kentucky Historical Society and Distributed by the University Press of Kentucky This period of Kentucky's history began with the unsettled society following the close of the Civil War, included bloody feuds, and closed with the tragic Goebel assassination.

A Girl's A Gun: Poems

by Rachel Danielle Peterson

Haunting and candid, A Girl’s A Gun introduces a poet whose bold voice merges heightened lyricism with compelling narrative.

Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? Murder, Mistrial, and Mystery

by Robert G. Lawson

On October 26, 1961, after an evening of studying with friends on the campus of Transylvania University, nineteen-year-old student Betty Gail Brown got into her car around midnight—presumably headed for home.

Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film

by Alan K. Rode

Academy Award–winning director Michael Curtiz (1886–1962)—whose best-known films include Casablanca (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Mildred Pierce (1945) and White Christmas (1954)—was in many ways the anti-auteur. During his unprecedented twenty-seven year tenure at Warner Bros.

Hitchhiker: Stories from the Kentucky Homefront

by Bob Thompson foreword by Roberta Simpson Brown

Growing up next door to his Granny’s country store in McCracken County, Kentucky, a very young Bob Thompson had unlimited access to the cold-drink box and shelves of candy.

Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine

by Kelley Fanto Deetz

In grocery store aisles and kitchens across the country, smiling images of “Aunt Jemima” and other historical and fictional black cooks can be found on various food products and in advertising.

The Beer Cheese Book

by Garin Pirnia

The ingredients are simple—beer, cheese, and spices—and the result is delicious.

Rereading Appalachia: Literacy, Place, and Cultural Resistance

edited by Sara Webb-Sunderhaus and Kim Donehower with contributions by Ryan Angus, Krista Bryson, Gregory Griffey, Emma Howes, Josh Iddings, Peter Mortensen, Nathan Shepley, Todd Snyder, and Kathryn Trauth Taylor

Appalachia faces overwhelming challenges that plague many rural areas across the country, including poorly funded schools, stagnant economic development, corrupt political systems, poverty, and drug abuse.

Appalachia Revisited: New Perspectives on Place, Tradition, and Progress

edited by William Schumann and Rebecca Adkins Fletcher

Known for its dramatic beauty and valuable natural resources, Appalachia has undergone significant technological, economic, political, and environmental changes in recent decades.

James Still: A Life

by Carol Boggess

James Still (1906–2001) first achieved national recognition in the 1930s as a poet, and he remains one of the most beloved and important writers in Appalachian literature.

You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Interviews with Stars from Hollywood’s Golden Era

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

Journalists James Bawden and Ron Miller spent their careers interviewing the greatest stars of Hollywood’s golden age.

Architect of Air Power: General Laurence S. Kuter and the Birth of the US Air Force

by Brian D. Laslie

At age 36, Laurence S. Kuter (1905–1979) became the youngest general officer since William T. Sherman.

Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

James Bawden: Seeing the way people behave when they’re around you, is it still fun being Cary Grant?

Irvin S. Cobb: The Rise and Fall of an American Humorist

by William E. Ellis

“Humor is merely tragedy standing on its head with its pants torn.

The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry

by Jane Gentry edited by Julia Johnson

Jane Gentry (1941–2014) possessed an uncanny ability to spin quietly expansive and wise verses from small details, objects, and remembered moments.

Forward with Patton: The World War II Diary of Colonel Robert S. Allen

by Robert S. Allen edited by John Nelson Rickard

Soldier, journalist, and Soviet spy Robert S. Allen (1900–1981) was a deeply controversial figure.

Lossberg's War: The World War I Memoirs of a German Chief of Staff

by Fritz von Lossberg edited by David T. Zabecki and Dieter J. Biedekarken foreword by Holger H. Herwig

General Fritz von Lossberg (1868–1942) directed virtually all the major German defensive battles on the Western Front during the First World War.

Anne Bancroft: A Life

by Douglass K. Daniel

“Mrs. Robinson, you’re trying to seduce me. Aren’t you?

At the Decisive Point in the Sinai: Generalship in the Yom Kippur War

by Jacob Even, IDF (Ret.) and Simcha B. Maoz, IDF (Ret.)

The Yom Kippur War pitted Israel against Syria in the north and Egypt in the south in October 1973.

Insurrections: Stories

by Rion Amilcar Scott

A suicidal father looks to an older neighbor—and the Cookie Monster—for salvation and sanctuary as his life begins to unravel.

Phantoms of Old Louisville: Ghostly Tales from America's Most Haunted Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

Haunts of Old Louisville: Gilded Age Ghosts and Haunted Mansions in America's Spookiest Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

Ghosts of Old Louisville: True Stories of Hauntings in America's Largest Victorian Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis

by Keona K. Ervin

Like most of the nation during the 1930s, St. Louis, Missouri, was caught in the stifling grip of the Great Depression.

Rückzug: The German Retreat from France, 1944

by Joachim Ludewig edited by David T. Zabecki

The Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, marked a critical turning point in the European theater of World War II. The massive landing on France’s coast had been meticulously planned for three years, and the Allies anticipated a quick and decisive defeat of the German forces.

For Brotherhood and Duty: The Civil War History of the West Point Class of 1862

by Brian R. McEnany

During the tense months leading up to the American Civil War, the cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point continued their education even as the nation threatened to dissolve around them.

Order in Chaos: The Memoirs of General of Panzer Troops Hermann Balck

by Hermann Balck Edited and Translated by Major General David T. Zabecki, USA (Ret.) and Lieutenant Colonel Dieter J. Biedekarken, USA (Ret.) foreword by Carlo D'Este

German general Hermann Balck (1897–1982) was considered to be one of World War II’s greatest battlefield commanders.

The Christmas Truce: Myth, Memory, and the First World War

by Terri Blom Crocker foreword by Peter Grant

In late December 1914, German and British soldiers on the western front initiated a series of impromptu, unofficial ceasefires.

Wars of Modern Babylon: A History of the Iraqi Army from 1921 to 2003

by Colonel Pesach Malovany, IDF (Ret.) introductions by Amatzia Baram and Kevin M. Woods forewords by Lt. General Amnon Lipkin-Shahak, IDF (Ret.) and Major General Ya’akov Amidror, IDF (Ret.)

As long as there have been wars, victors have written the prevailing histories of the world’s conflicts.

A Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor

edited by Henry T. Edmondson III with contributions by John Sikes Jr., Benjamin B. Alexander, Michael L. Schroeder, Margaret Earley Whitt, George Piggford, Sarah Gordon, Ralph Wood, Marc Bosco, Farrell O'Gorman, Gary Cuiba, Henry T. Edmondson III, John Roos, Christina Bieber-Lake, John F. Desmond, and Marion Montgomery

Acclaimed author and Catholic thinker Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964) penned two novels, two collections of short stories, various essays, and numerous book reviews over the course of her life.

A Political Companion to Philip Roth

edited by Claudia Franziska Brühwiler and Lee Trepanier with contributions by Lee Trepanier, Claudia Franziska Brühwiler, Philip Roth, Aimee Pozorski, Claudia Franziska Brühwiler, Simon Stow, Michael G. Festl, Louis Gordon, Matthew Shipe, Till Kinzel, Yael Maurer, Debra Shostak, Brett Ashley Kaplan, and Andy Connolly

Philip Roth is widely acknowledged as one of the twentieth century’s most prolific and acclaimed writers.

Wendell Berry and Higher Education: Cultivating Virtues of Place

by Jack R. Baker and Jeffrey Bilbro foreword by Wendell Berry

Prominent author and cultural critic Wendell Berry is well known for his contributions to agrarianism and environmentalism, but his commentary on education has received comparatively little attention.

Living Sustainably: What Intentional Communities Can Teach Us about Democracy, Simplicity, and Nonviolence

by A. Whitney Sanford

In light of concerns about food and human health, fraying social ties, economic uncertainty, and rampant consumerism, some people are foregoing a hurried, distracted existence and embracing a mindful way of living.

The Dream Is Lost: Voting Rights and the Politics of Race in Richmond, Virginia

by Julian Maxwell Hayter

Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history.

Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity

by Albert W. A. Schmid foreword by Loreal “Butcher Babe” Gavin photographs by Jessica Ebelhar

Burgoo, barbecue, and bourbon have long been acknowledged as a trinity of good taste in Kentucky.

Reagan and the World: Leadership and National Security, 1981–1989

edited by Bradley Lynn Coleman and Kyle Longley foreword by Jack Matlock Jr., James Graham Wilson, Beth Fischer, Ronald Granieri, James R. Locher III, Archie Brown, James Cooper, William Hitchcock, David F. Patton, Michael Schaller, Kyle Longley, Evan R. Ward, Charles BrowerIV, and Ryan Carpenter

Throughout his presidency, Ronald Reagan sought “peace through strength” during an era of historic change.

Remembering The Battle of the Crater: War as Murder

by Kevin M. Levin

The battle of the Crater is known as one of the Civil War’s bloodiest struggles—a Union loss with combined casualties of 5,000, many of whom were members of the United States Colored Troops (USCT) under Union Brigadier General Edward Ferrero.

Sabers through the Reich: World War II Corps Cavalry from Normandy to the Elbe

by William Stuart Nance foreword by Robert M. Citino

Before the Allies landed on the beaches of Normandy in June 1944, their aerial reconnaissance discovered signs of German defenses on the Îles St. Marcouf.

US Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton

edited by Andrew Johnstone and Andrew Priest with contributions by Andrew Johnstone, Andrew Priest, J. Simon Rofe, Michael F. Hopkins, Steven Casey, Scott Lucas, Sylvia Ellis, Thomas Tunstall Allcock, Sandra Scanlon, Thomas Alan Schwartz, Andrew Priest, Robert Mason, David Ryan, Robert A. Strong, Richard B. Schwartz, and Robert David Johnson

While domestic issues loom large in voters’ minds during American presidential elections, matters of foreign policy have consistently shaped candidates and their campaigns.

He's Got Rhythm: The Life and Career of Gene Kelly

by Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

He sang and danced in the rain, proclaimed New York to be a wonderful town, and convinced a group of Parisian children that they had rhythm.

Improvising Out Loud: My Life Teaching Hollywood How to Act

by Jeff Corey with Emily Corey foreword by Leonard Nimoy afterword by Janet Neipris

Jeff Corey (1914–2002) made a name for himself in the 1940s as a character actor in films like Superman and the Mole Men (1951), Joan of Arc (1948), and The Killers (1946). Everything changed in 1951, when he was summoned before the House Un-American Activities Committee.

Dalton Trumbo: Blacklisted Hollywood Radical

by Larry Ceplair and Christopher Trumbo

James Dalton Trumbo (1905–1976) is widely recognized for his work as a screenwriter, playwright, and author, but he is also remembered as one of the Hollywood Ten who opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee.

Charles Walters: The Director Who Made Hollywood Dance

by Brent Phillips

From the trolley scene in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’s last dance on the silver screen (The Barkleys of Broadway, 1949) to Judy Garland’s timeless, tuxedo-clad performance of “Get Happy” (Summer Stock, 1950), Charles Walters staged the iconic musical sequences of Hollywood’s golden age.

Harry Langdon: King of Silent Comedy

by Gabriella Oldham and Mabel Langdon foreword by Harry Langdon Jr.

Among silent film comedians, three names stand out—Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd—but Harry Langdon indisputably deserves to sit among them as the fourth “king.” In films such as The Strong Man (1926) and Long Pants (1927), Langdon parlayed his pantomime talents, expressive eyes, and childlike innocence into silent-era stardom.

Ranger: A Soldier's Life

by Colonel Ralph Puckett, USA (Ret.) with D. K. R. Crosswell afterword by General David H. Petraeus, USA (Ret.)

On November 25, 1950, during one of the toughest battles of the Korean War, the US Eighth Army Ranger Company seized and held the strategically important Hill 205 overlooking the Chongchon River.

Faces of Kentucky

by James C. Klotter and Freda C. Klotter

Written by Kentuckians for Kentuckians, Faces of Kentucky is a comprehensive history of Kentucky designed for young students.

Integrated: The Lincoln Institute, Basketball, and a Vanished Tradition

by James W. Miller

In Integrated, James W. Miller explores an often ignored aspect of America’s struggle for racial equality.

Kentucky Heirloom Seeds: Growing, Eating, Saving

by Bill Best with Dobree Adams foreword by A. Gwynn Henderson afterword by Brook Elliott

Saving seeds to plant for next year’s crop has been key to survival around the globe for millennia.

Blackberries, Blackberries

by Crystal Wilkinson foreword by Nikky Finney afterword by Honorée Jeffers

As the title implies, this beautifully written collection bursts with stories reminiscent of blackberries-–-small, succulent morsels that are inviting and sweet, yet sometimes bitter.

Water Street

by Crystal Wilkinson foreword by Jacinda Townsend afterword by Marianne Worthington

The residents of Water Street are hardworking, God-fearing people who live in a seemingly safe and insulated neighborhood within a small Kentucky town: “Water Street is a place where mothers can turn their backs to flip a pancake or cornmeal hoecake on the stove and know our children are safe.

A Rape in the Early Republic: Gender and Legal Culture in an 1806 Virginia Trial

by Alexander Smyth edited by Randal L. Hall

On January 14, 1806, Sidney Hanson was raped by John Deskins on a rough gravel path in the woods in Tazewell County, Virginia.

Crane: Sex, Celebrity, and My Father's Unsolved Murder

by Robert Crane and Christopher Fryer

On June 29, 1978, Bob Crane, known to Hogan’s Heroes fans as Colonel Hogan, was discovered brutally murdered in his Scottsdale, Arizona, apartment.

Nixon’s Back Channel to Moscow: Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

by Richard A. Moss foreword by Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

Most Americans consider détente—the reduction of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union—to be among the Nixon administration’s most significant foreign policy successes.

The Life and Work of John C. Campbell

by Olive Dame Campbell edited by Elizabeth M. Williams

John C. Campbell (1867–1919) is widely considered to be a pioneer in the objective study of the complex world of Appalachian mountaineers.

The Price of Scarlet: Poems

by Brianna Noll

A honeycomb long vacated by honeybees still possesses an “echo of the swarm, / a lingering song.

Mammoth Cave Curiosities: A Guide to Rockphobia, Dating, Saber-toothed Cats, and Other Subterranean Marvels

by Colleen O'Connor Olson

Sir Elton John, blind fish, the original Twinkie, President Ronald Reagan’s Secret Service detail, and mummies don’t usually come up in the same conversation—unless you’re at Mammoth Cave National Park!

Black Greek-letter Organizations in the Twenty-First Century: Our Fight Has Just Begun

edited by Gregory S. Parks foreword by Julianne Malveaux and Marc Morial

During the twentieth century, black Greek-Letter organizations (BGLOs) united college students dedicated to excellence, fostered kinship, and uplifted African Americans.

Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods, revised edition

by Aimee Zaring

Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands.

Alpha Phi Alpha: A Legacy of Greatness, the Demands of Transcendence

edited by Gregory S. Parks and Stefan M. Bradley foreword by Michael A. Blake

On December 4, 1906, on Cornell University’s campus, seven black men founded one of the greatest and most enduring organizations in American history.

Foreign Policy at the Periphery: The Shifting Margins of US International Relations since World War II

edited by Bevan Sewell and Maria Ryan

As American interests assumed global proportions after 1945, policy makers were faced with the challenge of prioritizing various regions and determining the extent to which the United States was prepared to defend and support them.

Faith in Black Power: Religion, Race, and Resistance in Cairo, Illinois

by Kerry Pimblott

In 1969, nineteen-year-old Robert Hunt was found dead in the Cairo, Illinois, police station.

My Life in Focus: A Photographer’s Journey with Elizabeth Taylor and the Hollywood Jet Set

by Gianni Bozzacchi with Joey Tayler

When Gianni Bozzacchi accepted an assignment as a photographer on the set of The Comedians (1967), he didn’t know that his life was about to change forever.

Selma to Saigon: The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War

by Daniel S. Lucks

The civil rights and anti–Vietnam War movements were the two greatest protests of twentieth-century America.

Religion and Resistance in Appalachia: Faith and the Fight against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining

by Joseph D. Witt

In the last fifty years, the Appalachian Mountains have suffered permanent and profound change due to the expansion of surface coal mining.

Writing the Legal Record: Law Reporters in Nineteenth-Century Kentucky

by Kurt X. Metzmeier

Any student of American history knows of Washington, Jefferson, and the other statesmen who penned the documents that form the legal foundations of our nation, but many other great minds contributed to the development of the young republic’s judicial system—figures such as William Littell, Ben Monroe, and John J. Marshall.

Catherine Spalding, SCN: A Life in Letters

by Mary Ellen Doyle, SCN

At the age of nineteen, Catherine Spalding (1793–1858) ventured into what would become a lifetime of leadership with the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth (SCN)—one of the most significant American religious communities for women.

Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic

by James P. Cousins

Outspoken New England urbanite Horace Holley (1781–1827) was an unlikely choice to become the president of Transylvania University—the first college established west of the Allegheny Mountains.

Willis Duke Weatherford: Race, Religion, and Reform in the American South

by Andrew McNeill Canady

At the turn of the twentieth century, few white, southern leaders would speak out in favor of racial equality for fear of being dismissed as too progressive.

Stoner's Boy: A Seckatary Hawkins Mystery

by Robert F. Schulkers introduction by Randy Schulkers and Diane Schneider

Mr. Stoner is bad, and it seems his son is turning out just the same.

A Political Companion to Marilynne Robinson

edited by Shannon L. Mariotti and Joseph H. Lane Jr.

Marilynne Robinson is arguably one of the most important writers of our time.

Hollywood Divided: The 1950 Screen Directors Guild Meeting and the Impact of the Blacklist

by Kevin Brianton

On October 22, 1950, the Screen Directors Guild (SDG) gathered for a meeting at the opulent Beverly Hills Hotel.

The Gray Ghost: A Seckatary Hawkins Mystery

by Robert F. Schulkers introduction by Randy Schulkers and Diane Schneider

Everyone thought Stoner’s Boy was dead.

Kentucky and the Great War: World War I on the Home Front

by David J. Bettez

From five thousand children marching in a parade, singing, “Johnnie get your hoe.

Religion and Sustainable Agriculture: World Spiritual Traditions and Food Ethics

edited by Todd LeVasseur, Pramod Parajuli, and Norman Wirzba foreword by Vandana Shiva

Distinct practices of eating are at the heart of many of the world’s faith traditions—from the Christian Eucharist to Muslim customs of fasting during Ramadan to the vegetarianism and asceticism practiced by some followers of Hinduism and Buddhism.

Showman of the Screen: Joseph E. Levine and His Revolutions in Film Promotion

by A. T. McKenna

Short, immaculately dressed, and shockingly foul-mouthed, Joseph E. Levine (1905–1987) was larger than life.

Japan after 3/11: Global Perspectives on the Earthquake, Tsunami, and Fukushima Meltdown

edited by Pradyumna P. Karan and Unryu Suganuma

On March 11, 2011, an underwater earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku, Japan, triggered one of the most devastating tsunamis of a generation.

Amphibians and Reptiles of Land Between the Lakes

by David H. Snyder, A. Floyd Scott, Edmund J. Zimmerer, and David F. Frymire

Known for its natural beauty, Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area is the largest inland peninsula in the United States.

Kentucky Rebel Town: The Civil War Battles of Cynthiana and Harrison County

by William A. Penn

On April 22, 1861, within weeks of the surrender at Fort Sumter, fresh recruits marched to the Cynthiana, Kentucky, depot—one of the state’s first volunteer companies to join the Confederate army.