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Pop Culture and the Dark Side of the American Dream: Con Men, Gangsters, Drug Lords, and Zombies

by Paul A. Cantor

The many con men, gangsters, and drug lords portrayed in popular culture are examples of the dark side of the American dream.

Ridley Scott: A Biography

by Vincent LoBrutto

With celebrated works such as Alien, Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise, and Gladiator, Ridley Scott has secured his place in Hollywood.

Olivia de Havilland: Lady Triumphant

by Victoria Amador

Legendary actress and two-time Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939). She often inhabited characters who were delicate, elegant, and refined.

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

by Jennifer S. Kelly foreword by Steve Haskin

He was always destined to be a champion.

Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934

by Wray R. Johnson

Unlike the relative uniformity of conventional warfare, the peculiarities of small wars prevent a clear definition of rules and roles for military forces to follow.

Wild Yet Tasty: A Guide to Edible Plants of Eastern Kentucky

by Dan Dourson and Judy Dourson illustrated by Dan Dourson

Eastern Kentucky is home to a number of breathtaking natural attractions.

Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball

by James Duane Bolin

Known as the “Man in the Brown Suit” and “The Baron of the Bluegrass,” Adolph Rupp (1901–1977) is a towering figure in the history of college athletics.

Wildflowers and Ferns of Red River Gorge and the Greater Red River Basin

by Dan Dourson and Judy Dourson

The Red River Gorge’s intricate canyon system features an abundance of high sandstone cliffs, rock shelters, waterfalls, and natural bridges, making it one of the world’s top rock-climbing destinations.

Fishing the Jumps: A Novel

by Lamar Herrin

But in fishing the jumps there comes a moment when an insatiable hunger rises up in you and everything turns wild.

The Struggle Is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation

by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson.

A New History of Kentucky, second edition

by James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state.

Amreekiya: A Novel

by Lena Mahmoud

Isra Shadi, a twenty-one-year-old woman of mixed Palestinian and white descent, lives in California with her paternal amu (uncle), amtu (aunt), and cousins after the death of her mother and abandonment by her father at a young age.

College for the Commonwealth: A Case for Higher Education in American Democracy

by Michael T. Benson and Hal R. Boyd foreword by E. Gordon Gee

In the past decade, states across the nation have cut higher education spending per student by more than 15 percent.

Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing's Most Famous Cold Case

by Milton C. Toby

It was a cold and foggy February night in 1983 when a group of armed thieves crept onto Ballymany Stud, near The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland, to steal Shergar, one of the Thoroughbred industry’s most renowned stallions.

Mend: Poems

by Kwoya Fagin Maples

The inventor of the speculum, J. Marion Sims, is celebrated as the “father of modern gynecology,” and a memorial at his birthplace honors “his service to suffering women, empress and slave alike.

Jarmila Novotná: My Life in Song

by Jarmila Novotná edited by William V. Madison foreword by Brian Kellow

A legendary beauty, hailed as one of the greatest singing actors of her time, Jarmila Novotná (1907–1994) was an internationally known opera soprano from the former Czechoslovakia.

War and Remembrance: The Story of the American Battle Monuments Commission

by Thomas H. Conner foreword by James Scott Wheeler

"No soldier could ask for a sweeter resting place than on the field of glory where he fell.

Elkhorn: Evolution of a Kentucky Landscape

by Richard Taylor

When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as “Taylor’s Folly.

Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men: A Reader's Companion

by Jonathan S. Cullick

Robert Penn Warren is one of the best-known and most consequential Kentucky writers of the twentieth century and the only American writer to have won three Pulitzers in two different genres.

Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader

by Bobbie Ann Mason Introduction by George Saunders

Bobbie Ann Mason burst onto the American literary scene during a renaissance of short fiction that Raymond Carver called a “literary phenomenon.

Thunder in the Argonne: A New History of America’s Greatest Battle

by Douglas V. Mastriano

In July 1918, sensing that the German Army had lost crucial momentum, Supreme Allied Commander Ferdinand Foch saw an opportunity to end the First World War.

Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places

by John I. Gilderbloom

Bright, vibrant, intriguing, and unique, chromatic homes are speckled across the world’s landscape.

Lincoln’s Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America’s Greatest President

by Kathryn Canavan

When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln’s head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike.

The Mentelles: Mary Todd Lincoln, Henry Clay, and the Immigrant Family Who Educated Antebellum Kentucky

by Randolph Paul Runyon

Though they were not, as Charlotte claimed, refugees from the French Revolution, Augustus Waldemar and Charlotte Victoire Mentelle undoubtedly felt like exiles in their adopted hometown of Lexington, Kentucky—a settlement that was still a frontier town when they arrived in 1798.

The Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy

by Pellom McDaniels III

Isaac Burns Murphy (1861–1896) was one of the most dynamic jockeys of his era.