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Tales from Kentucky Sheriffs

by William Lynwood Montell

Following the success of his collections of stories from funeral directors, schoolteachers, doctors, and lawyers, folklorist William Lynwood Montell presents a new volume of tales from Kentucky sheriffs.

Tales from Kentucky Nurses

by William Lynwood Montell

From frontier times to the present day, Kentucky nurses have served with intelligence and energy, always ensuring that their patients received the best available care.

The Civil War on the Mississippi : Union Sailors, Gunboat Captains, and the Campaign to Control the River

by Barbara Brooks Tomblin

Flowing from its source in northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, the Mississippi River borders or passes through ten different states and serves as one of the most important transportation systems in the United States.

Aid Under Fire: Nation Building and the Vietnam War

by Jessica Elkind

In the aftermath of World War II, as longstanding empires collapsed and former colonies struggled for independence, the United States employed new diplomatic tools to counter unprecedented challenges to its interests across the globe.

Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action, and the Origins of the Second Indochina War

by William J. Rust

Although most Americans paid little attention to Cambodia during Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency, the nation’s proximity to China and the global ideological struggle with the Soviet Union guaranteed US vigilance throughout Southeast Asia.

Battlefield Surgeon: Life and Death on the Front Lines of World War II

by Paul A. Kennedy edited by Christopher B. Kennedy foreword by Rick Atkinson and afterword by John T. Greenwood

In November 1942, Paul Andrew Kennedy (1912–1993) boarded the St. Elena in New York Harbor and sailed for Casablanca as part of Operation Torch, the massive Allied invasion of North Africa.

The Reluctant Film Art of Woody Allen, second edition

by Peter J. Bailey

For five decades, no American filmmaker has been as prolific—or as paradoxical—as Woody Allen.

China’s Encounter with Global Hollywood: Cultural Policy and the Film Industry, 1994-2013

by Wendy Su

In recent years, the film industry in the People’s Republic of China has found itself among the top three most prolific in the world.

Lincoln before Lincoln: Early Cinematic Adaptations of the Life of America’s Greatest President

by Brian J. Snee

Remembered as the Savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln is one of America’s most revered presidents.

Dangerous Doctrine: How Obama's Grand Strategy Weakened America

by Robert G. Kaufman

Much like Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, President Barack Obama came to office as a politician who emphasized conviction rather than consensus.

Building a Healthy Economy from the Bottom Up: Harnessing Real-World Experience for Transformative Change

by Anthony Flaccavento foreword by Bill McKibben

The global economy has witnessed important changes in recent years.

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South

by Sergio A. Lussana

Trapped in a world of brutal physical punishment and unremitting, back-breaking labor, Frederick Douglass mused that it was the friendships he shared with other enslaved men that carried him through his darkest days.

The Notorious John Morrissey: How a Bare-Knuckle Brawler Became a Congressman and Founded Saratoga Race Course

by James C. Nicholson

An Irish immigrant, a collection agent for crime bosses, a professional boxer, and a prodigious gambler, John Morrissey was—if nothing else—an unlikely candidate to become one of the most important figures in the history of Thoroughbred racing.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights Activism in the North

edited by Mary Lou Finley, Bernard LaFayette Jr., James R. Ralph Jr., and Pam Smith foreword by Clayborne Carson

Six months after the Selma to Montgomery marches and just weeks after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a group from Martin Luther King Jr.’s staff arrived in Chicago, eager to apply his nonviolent approach to social change in a northern city.

Alben Barkley: A Life in Politics

by James K. Libbey

Born to poor tenant farmers in a log cabin in Graves County, Kentucky, Alben Barkley (1877–1956) rose to achieve a national political stature equaled by few of his contemporaries.

The Arthurdale Community School: Education and Reform in Depression Era Appalachia

by Sam F. Stack Jr.

The first of many homestead communities designed during the rollout of the New Deal, Arthurdale, West Virginia, was a bold experiment in progressive social planning.

Kentucky's Natural Heritage: An Illustrated Guide to Biodiversity

Greg Abernathy, Deborah White, Ellis L. Laudermilk, and Marc Evans

Kentucky's abundance of plant and animal life, from the bottomland swamps in the west to the rich Appalachian forests in the east, is extraordinary as well as beautiful.

A Simple Freedom: The Strong Mind of Robben Island Prisoner No. 468/64

by Ahmed Kathrada with Tim Couzens introduction by Nelson Mandela

In June 1964, South Africa’s most visible antiapartheid activists were sentenced to life in prison in the infamous Rivonia Trial.

Veit Harlan: The Life and Work of a Nazi Filmmaker

by Frank Noack

Veit Harlan (1899–1964) was one of Germany’s most controversial and loathed directors.

The Birds of Opulence

by Crystal Wilkinson

From the critically acclaimed, award-winning author of Blackberries, Blackberries and Water Street comes an astonishing new novel.

The Man Who Loved Birds: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Having taken great risks—to immigrate to America, to take monastic vows—Bengali physician Meena Chatterjee and Brother Flavian are each seeking safety and security when they encounter Johnny Faye, a Vietnam vet, free spirit, and expert marijuana farmer.

Inside Israel's Northern Command: The Yom Kippur War on the Syrian Border

edited by Brigadier General Dani Asher, IDF (Ret.) with contributions by Yitzhak Hofi, Uri Simchoni, Avraham Bar David, and Hagai Mann

On October 6, 1973, Israel’s Northern Command was surprised by the thunder of cannon fire and the sight of dense, black smoke.

Scissors, Paper, Rock: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Along with his siblings, Raphael Hardin left his childhood home in rural Kentucky.

Northern Kentucky University: A Panoramic History

photographs by Thomas R. Schiff with contributions by W. Michael Ryan, James C. Claypool, Tom Zaniello, Robert K. Wallace, Carole Beere, and Gail Wells

Northern Kentucky University’s evolution from an educational branch of the University of Kentucky into a major university in its own right is a tale of promise and humble beginnings.

A Life for Freedom: The Mission to End Racial Injustice in South Africa

by Denis Goldberg foreword by Z. Pallo Jordan

From June 1963 to October 1964, ten antiapartheid activists were tried at South Africa’s Pretoria Supreme Court.

Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply

by Vandana Shiva

For the farmer, the seed is not merely the source of future plants and food; it is a vehicle through which culture and history can be preserved and spread to future generations.

The Violence of the Green Revolution: Third World Agriculture, Ecology, and Politics

by Vandana Shiva

The Green Revolution has been heralded as a political and technological achievement—unprecedented in human history.

The Historic Kentucky Kitchen: Traditional Recipes for Today's Cook

by Deirdre A. Scaggs and Andrew W. McGraw foreword by John van Willigen

Kitchens serve as more than a place to prepare food; they are cornerstones of the home and family.

Enemies to Allies: Cold War Germany and American Memory

by Brian C. Etheridge

At the close of World War II, the United States went from being allied with the Soviet Union against Germany to alignment with the Germans against the Soviet Union—almost overnight.

Crossing the River: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Make no mistake: Martha Bragg Picket is a headstrong southern woman with a rebellious spirit, a characteristic her son Michael shares.

The Political Thought of Henry David Thoreau: Privatism and the Practice of Philosophy

by Jonathan McKenzie

Today, Henry David Thoreau’s status as one of America’s most influential public intellectuals remains unchallenged.

American Justice in Taiwan: The 1957 Riots and Cold War Foreign Policy

by Stephen G. Craft

On May 23, 1957, US Army Sergeant Robert Reynolds was acquitted of murdering Chinese officer Liu Ziran in Taiwan.

Burley: Kentucky Tobacco in a New Century

by Ann K. Ferrell

Once iconic American symbols, tobacco farms are gradually disappearing.

Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains

by Mike Norris illustrated by Minnie Adkins

Playing hopscotch in the schoolyard or hide-and-seek in the woods, Appalachian children once recited traditional nursery rhymes from memory.

Albert Capellani: Pioneer of the Silent Screen

by Christine Leteux foreword by Kevin Brownlow

In recent years, technology has given films of the silent era and their creators a second life as new processes have eased their restoration and distribution.

In Peace and Freedom: My Journey in Selma

by Bernard LaFayette Jr. and Kathryn Lee Johnson foreword by Congressman John Robert Lewis afterword by Raymond Arsenault

Bernard LaFayette Jr. (b. 1940) was a cofounder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a leader in the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins, a Freedom Rider, an associate of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and the national coordinator of the Poor People’s Campaign.

Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America’s First Undeclared War

by Larry Blomstedt

Three days after North Korean premier Kim Il Sung launched a massive military invasion of South Korea on June 24, 1950, President Harry S. Truman responded, dispatching air and naval support to South Korea.

Virtual Afterlives: Grieving the Dead in the Twenty-First Century

by Candi K. Cann

For millennia, the rituals of death and remembrance have been fixed by time and location, but in the twenty-first century, grieving has become a virtual phenomenon.

In Search of the Good Life: A Pedogogy for Troubled Times

by Fred Dallmayr

The great German novelist Thomas Mann implored readers to resist the persistent and growing militarism of the mid-twentieth century.

Sacred Mountains: A Christian Ethical Approach to Mountaintop Removal

by Andrew R. H. Thompson

On a misty morning in eastern Kentucky, cross-bearing Christians gather for a service on a surface-mined mountain.

Freedom and Solidarity: Toward New Beginnings

by Fred Dallmayr

The prevailing Western paradigm is modernity: a model focused on individual liberty, secularism, and the scientific control of nature.

Russell Kirk: American Conservative

by Bradley J. Birzer

Emerging from two decades of the Great Depression and the New Deal and facing the rise of radical ideologies abroad, the American Right seemed beaten, broken, and adrift in the early 1950s.

Sidney J. Furie: Life and Films

by Daniel Kremer

Known for his visual style as well as for his experimentation in virtually every genre of narrative cinema, award-winning director Sidney J. Furie also has the distinction of having made Canada’s first ever feature-length fictional film in English, A Dangerous Age (1957). With a body of work that includes The Ipcress File (1965), Lady Sings the Blues (1972), and The Entity (1982), he has collaborated with major stars such as Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, Robert Redford, and Michael Caine, and his films have inspired some of Hollywood’s most celebrated directors, including Stanley Kubrick and Quentin Tarantino.

Stuntwomen: The Untold Hollywood Story

by Mollie Gregory

They’ve traded punches in knockdown brawls, crashed biplanes through barns, and raced to the rescue in fast cars.

Integral Pluralism: Beyond Culture Wars

by Fred Dallmayr

In addition to war, terrorism, and unchecked military violence, modernity is also subject to less visible but no less venomous conflicts.

James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

by Sara Rzeszutek

James Jackson and Esther Cooper Jackson grew up understanding that opportunities came differently for blacks and whites, men and women, rich and poor.

Return to Nature? An Ecological Counterhistory

by Fred Dallmayr

Sustainability has become a compelling topic of domestic and international debate as the world searches for effective solutions to accumulating ecological problems.

Being in the World: Dialogue and Cosmopolis

by Fred Dallmayr

It is commonly agreed that we live in an age of globalization, but the profound consequences of this development are rarely understood.

A War of Logistics: Parachutes and Porters in Indochina, 1945–1954

by Charles R. Shrader

Following the French reoccupation of Indochina at the end of World War II, the pro-Communist Vietnamese nationalists, or Viet Minh, launched a grassroots insurgency that erupted into a full-fledged war in 1949.

Venerable Trees: History, Biology, and Conservation in the Bluegrass

by Tom Kimmerer

When the first settlers arrived in the Bluegrass region of Kentucky, they found an astonishing landscape of open woodland grazed by vast herds of bison.

Jutland: World War I's Greatest Naval Battle

edited by

During the first two years of World War I, Germany struggled to overcome a crippling British blockade of its mercantile shipping lanes.

Jacob L. Devers: A General's Life

by James Scott Wheeler foreword by Rick Atkinson

General Jacob L. “Jake” Devers (1897–1979) was one of only two officers—the other was Omar C. Bradley—to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944–1945 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany.

The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

edited by Gerald L. Smith, Karen Cotton McDaniel, and John A. Hardin

The story of African Americans in Kentucky is as diverse and vibrant as the state’s general history.

Committed to Victory: The Kentucky Home Front During World War II

by Richard E. Holl

When World War II broke out in Europe in September 1939, Kentucky was still plagued by the Great Depression.

The Birth of Bourbon: A Photographic Tour of Early Distilleries

photographs by Carol Peachee foreword by Jim Gray

Whiskey making has been an integral part of American history since frontier times.

Lincoln’s Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America’s Greatest President

by Kathryn Canavan

When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln’s head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike.

The Manhattan Cocktail: A Modern Guide to the Whiskey Classic

by Albert W. A. Schmid foreword by Bridget Albert

Alongside other classic cocktails such as the Old Fashioned, the Mint Julep, and the Martini, the Manhattan has been a staple of the sophisticated bar scene since the late nineteenth century.

Next Door to the Dead: Poems

by Kathleen Driskell

When Kathleen Driskell tells her husband that she’s gone to visit the neighbors, she means something different than most.

Kontum: The Battle to Save South Vietnam

by Thomas P. McKenna

In the spring of 1972, North Vietnam invaded South Vietnam in what became known as the Easter Offensive.

The Longest Rescue: The Life and Legacy of Vietnam POW William A. Robinson

by Glenn Robins foreword by Colonel Bud Day

While serving as a crew chief aboard a U.S. Air Force Rescue helicopter, Airman First Class William A. Robinson was shot down and captured in Ha Tinh Province, North Vietnam, on September 20, 1965.

Kentucky by Design: The Decorative Arts and American Culture

edited by Andrew Kelly with contributions by Madeleine Burnside, Philippe Chavance, Lauren Churilla, Larrie Curry, Erika Doss, Michelle Ganz, Jean M. Burks, Mel Hankla, Kate Hesseldenz, Tommy Hines, Jerrold Hirsch, Lee Kogan, Ron Pen, Janet Rae, Allan Weiss, and Shelly Zegart

The Index of American Design was one of the most significant undertakings of the Federal Art Project—the visual arts arm of the Works Progress Administration.

Haunted Holidays: Twelve Months of Kentucky Ghosts

by Roberta Simpson Brown and Lonnie E. Brown

With its tales of benevolent and malicious specters, terrifying monsters, and unexplained phenomena, Halloween is the holiday most people associate with spooky stories.

Explaining Traditions: Folk Behavior in Modern Culture

by Simon J. Bronner

Why do humans hold onto traditions?

China Looks at the West: Identity, Global Ambitions, and the Future of Sino-American Relations

by Christopher A. Ford

Chinese leaders have long been fascinated by the United States, but have often chosen to demonize America for perceived cultural and military imperialism.

Kentucky Maverick: The Life and Adventures of Colonel George M. Chinn

by Carlton Jackson

Colonel George M. Chinn’s (1902–1987) life story reads more like fiction than the biography of a Kentucky soldier.

The Mind of Empire: China's History and Modern Foreign Relations

by Christopher A. Ford

With an economy and population that dwarf most industrialized nations, China is emerging as a twenty-first-century global superpower.

Democracy in Central Asia: Competing Perspectives and Alternative Strategies

by Mariya Y. Omelicheva

Promoting democracy has long been a priority of Western foreign policy.

The Air Force Way of War: U.S. Tactics and Training after Vietnam

by Brian D. Laslie

On December 18, 1972, more than one hundred U.S. B-52 bombers flew over North Vietnam to initiate Operation Linebacker II. During the next eleven days, sixteen of these planes were shot down and another four suffered heavy damage.

Obama at War: Congress and the Imperial Presidency

by Ryan C. Hendrickson

During President Barack Obama’s first term in office, the United States expanded its military presence in Afghanistan and increased drone missile strikes across Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia.

The Price of China's Economic Development: Power, Capital, and the Poverty of Rights

by Zhaohui Hong

The People’s Republic of China has experienced significant transformations since Deng Xiaoping instituted economic reforms in 1978.

Ziegfeld and His Follies: A Biography of Broadway’s Greatest Producer

by Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

The name Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. (1867–1932) is synonymous with the decadent revues that the legendary impresario produced at the turn of the twentieth century.

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie

by Joseph A. Fry

To fully comprehend the Vietnam War, it is essential to understand the central role that southerners played in the nation’s commitment to the war, in the conflict’s duration, and in the fighting itself.

Fighting Jim Crow in the County of Kings: The Congress of Racial Equality in Brooklyn

by Brian Purnell

The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) established a reputation as one of the most important civil rights organizations of the early 1960s.

Lincoln Gordon: Architect of Cold War Foreign Policy

by Bruce L. R. Smith

After World War II, American statesman and scholar Lincoln Gordon emerged as one of the key players in the reconstruction of Europe.

Army Diplomacy: American Military Occupation and Foreign Policy after World War II

by Walter M. Hudson

In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the United States Army became the principal agent of American foreign policy.

Hollywood Presents Jules Verne: The Father of Science Fiction on Screen

by Brian Taves

Even for those who have never read Jules Verne (1828–1905), the author’s very name conjures visions of the submarine in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, the epic race in Around the World in Eighty Days, the spacecraft in From the Earth to the Moon, and the daring descent in Journey to the Center of the Earth.

A Nazi Past: Recasting German Identity in Postwar Europe

edited by David A. Messenger and Katrin Paehler

Since the end of World War II, historians and psychologists have investigated the factors that motivated Germans to become Nazis before and during the war.

The Conversion of Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg: From Isolation to International Engagement

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

The United States has looked inward throughout most of its history, preferring to avoid “foreign entanglements,” as George Washington famously advised.

Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier’s Memoir

by General John R. Galvin USA (Ret.) foreword by General David H. Petraeus USA (Ret.)

When four-star general John Rogers Galvin retired from the US Army after forty-four years of distinguished service in 1992, the Washington Post hailed him as a man “without peer among living generals.

Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750-1860

by Watson W. Jennison

From the eighteenth century to the eve of the Civil War, Georgia’s racial order shifted from the somewhat fluid conception of race prevalent in the colonial era to the harsher understanding of racial difference prevalent in the antebellum era.

The Citizen Soldiers: The Plattsburg Training Camp Movement, 1913-1920, new edition

by John Garry Clifford

The Citizen Soldiers explores the military reform movement that took its name from the famous Business Men’s Military Training Camps at Plattsburg, New York.

Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods

by Aimee Zaring

Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands.

Hitchcock Lost and Found: The Forgotten Films

by Alain Kerzoncuf and Charles Barr foreword by Philip French

Known as the celebrated director of critical and commercial successes such as Psycho (1960) and The Birds (1963), Alfred Hitchcock is famous for his distinctive visual style and signature motifs.

The Civil War Guerrilla: Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth

edited by Joseph M. Beilein Jr. and Matthew C. Hulbert

Most Americans are familiar with major Civil War battles such as Manassas (Bull Run), Shiloh, and Gettysburg, which have been extensively analyzed by generations of historians.

Diary of a Southern Refugee during the War, annotated edition

by Judith Brockenbrough McGuire edited by James I. Robertson Jr.

Judith Brockenbrough McGuire’s Diary of a Southern Refugee during the War is among the first of such works published after the Civil War.

Mellencamp: American Troubadour

by David Masciotra

Throughout his prolific career, John Mellencamp has performed more than twenty Top 40 hits, has been nominated for thirteen Grammy Awards, and has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Bloody Breathitt: Politics and Violence in the Appalachian South

by T.R.C. Hutton

The notorious conflict between the Hatfield and the McCoy families of West Virginia and Kentucky is often remembered as America’s most famous feud, but it was relatively brief and subdued compared to the violence in Breathitt County, Kentucky.

Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878

by Emily Satterwhite

Much criticism has been directed at negative stereotypes of Appalachia perpetuated by movies, television shows, and news media.

For Slavery and Union: Benjamin Buckner and Kentucky Loyalties in the Civil War

by Patrick A. Lewis

Benjamin Forsythe Buckner (1836–1901) faced a dire choice as the flames of Civil War threatened his native Kentucky.

Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force

by Robert M. Farley

The United States needs airpower, but does it need an air force?

My Life as a Mankiewicz: An Insider’s Journey through Hollywood

by Tom Mankiewicz and Robert Crane

The son of famed director and screenwriter Joseph L. Mankiewicz (All About Eve [1950], Guys and Dolls [1955], Cleopatra [1963]) and the nephew of Citizen Kane screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz, Tom Mankiewicz was genuine Hollywood royalty.

Civil Society and Politics in Central Asia

edited by Charles E. Ziegler with contributions by Charles E. Ziegler, Reuel Hanks, Andrey A. Kazantsev, Dilshod Achilov, Marlene Laruelle, Erica Johnson, Ken Charman, Rakhymzhan Assangaziyev, Ruslan Kazkenov, Charles Buxton, Charles J. Sullivan, Sabine Freizer, and Graeme P. Herd

The five Central Asian states of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan constitute an area of increasing importance in global politics.

King Lear and the Gods

by William R. Elton

Many critics hold that Shakespeare’s King Lear is primarily a drama of meaningful suffering and redemption within a just universe ruled by providential higher powers.

Kingsport, Tennessee: A Planned American City

by Margaret Ripley Wolfe

Kingsport, Tennessee, was the first thoroughly diversified, professionally planned, and privately financed city in twentieth-century America.

Lafcadio Hearn's America: Ethnographic Sketches and Editorials

edited by Simon J. Bronner

The American essays of renowned writer Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) artistically chronicle the robust urban life of Cincinnati and New Orleans.

Language, Race, and Social Class in Howells's America

by Elsa Nettels

No other American novelist has written so fully about language—grammar, diction, the place of colloquialism and dialect in literary English, the relation between speech and writing—as William Dean Howells.

The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork

by Hunter James

The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork recounts newspaperman Hunter James’s attempts to save his 100-year-old family farm and homestead from extinction.

Legislating Racism: The Billion Dollar Congress and the Birth of Jim Crow

by Thomas Adams Upchurch

The Civil War and Reconstruction were characterized by two lasting legacies—the failure to bring racial harmony to the South and the failure to foster reconciliation between the North and South.

The Life and Photography of Doris Ulmann

by Philip Walker Jacobs

Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) was one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, yet until now there has never been a biography of this fascinating, gifted artist.

The Life of the Parties: Activists in Presidential Politics

by Ronald Rapoport, Alan I. McGlennon, and John Abramowitz

Commentators, especially since the Democratic party reforms following 1968, have expressed serious concerns about the role of party activists in the American political system.