Newly Released Titles

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James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

by Sara Rzeszutek

James Jackson and Esther Cooper Jackson grew up understanding that opportunities came differently for blacks and whites, men and women, rich and poor.

Appalachia in Regional Context: Place Matters

edited by Dwight B. Billings and Ann E. Kingsolver with contributions by Barbara Ellen Smith, John Pickles, John Gaventa, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Carol A. Mason, Mary L. Gray, bell hooks, Rich Kirby, John Haywood, Ron Pen, Gina Caison, David A. Davis, Laura Hernandez-Ehrisman, Kent C. Ryden, and Emily Satterwhite

In an increasingly globalized world, place matters more than ever.

A Political Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois

edited by Nick Bromell with contributions by Charles Mills, Lewis R. Gordon, Anthony Reed, James E. Ford III, Melvin L. Rogers, Nick Bromell, Robert W. Williams, Alexander Livingston, Arash Davari, David Haekwon Kim, and Vijay Phulwani

Literary scholars and historians have long considered W. E. B. Du Bois (1868–1963) an extremely influential writer and a powerful cultural critic.

Just War Reconsidered: Strategy, Ethics, and Theory

by James M. Dubik foreword by General Martin Dempsey, USA (Ret.)

In the seminal Just and Unjust Wars, Michael Walzer famously considered the ethics of modern warfare, examining the moral issues that arise before, during, and after conflict.

The Birds of Opulence

by Crystal Wilkinson

From the critically acclaimed, award-winning author of Blackberries, Blackberries and Water Street comes an astonishing new novel.

Make Way for Her: And Other Stories

by Katie Cortese

A girl afflicted with pyrokinesis tries to control her fire-starting long enough to go to a dance with a boy she likes.

Black Bone: 25 Years of the Affrilachian Poets

edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden

The Appalachian region stretches from Mississippi to New York, encompassing rural areas as well as cities from Birmingham to Pittsburgh.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights Activism in the North

edited by Mary Lou Finley, Bernard LaFayette Jr., James R. Ralph Jr., and Pam Smith foreword by Clayborne Carson

Six months after the Selma to Montgomery marches and just weeks after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a group from Martin Luther King Jr.’s staff arrived in Chicago, eager to apply his nonviolent approach to social change in a northern city.

Forty Minutes to Glory: Inside the Kentucky Wildcats’ 1978 Championship Season

by Doug Brunk forewords by Larry Vaught and Tom Leach featuring chapters by Jack Givens, Joe B. Hall, and others

“Winning a national title . . . winning it at Kentucky?

Harold Stassen: Eisenhower, the Cold War, and the Pursuit of Nuclear Disarmament

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

Harold Stassen (1907–2001) garnered accolades as the thirty-one-year-old “boy wonder” governor of Minnesota and quickly assumed a national role as aide to Admiral William Halsey Jr. during World War II. When Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected in 1952, Stassen was named director of the Mutual Security Administration and then became the president’s special assistant for disarmament.

Kentucky Confederates: Secession, Civil War, and the Jackson Purchase

by Berry Craig

During the Civil War, the majority of Kentuckians supported the Union under the leadership of Henry Clay, but one part of the state presented a striking exception.

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

Kentucky’s Rebel Press: Pro-Confederate Media and the Secession Crisis

by Berry Craig

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky.

The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable

by Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier edited by Carolyn Woodward

Before Jane Austen’s novels explored heroines in English society, writers Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier dared to provide commentary on gender and education through self-conscious narratives.

Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans

by James W. Pardew

The wars that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s were the deadliest European conflicts since World War II. The violence escalated to the point of genocide when, over the course of ten days in July 1995, Serbian troops under the command of General Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 unarmed men and boys who had sought refuge at a UN safe-haven in Srebrenica.