Newly Released Titles

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A Political Companion to Frederick Douglass

edited by Neil Roberts with contributions by Paul Gilroy, Bernard Boxill, Margaret Kohn, Angela Y. Davis, Robert Gooding-Williams, Jack Turner, Ange-Marie Alfaro, Nicholas Buccola, Peter C. Myers, Vincent Lloyd, Anne Norton, Herbert Storing, Jason Frank, and Nick Bromell

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was a prolific writer and public speaker whose impact on American literature and history has been long studied by historians and literary critics.

Stuntwomen: The Untold Hollywood Story

by Mollie Gregory

They’ve traded punches in knockdown brawls, crashed biplanes through barns, and raced to the rescue in fast cars.

Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader

by Bobbie Ann Mason Introduction by George Saunders

Bobbie Ann Mason burst onto the American literary scene during a renaissance of short fiction that Raymond Carver called a “literary phenomenon.

A Guide to Cyanobacteria: Identification and Impact

by Mark A. Nienaber and Miriam Steinitz-Kannan

Blue-green algae (also known as cyanobacteria) and the toxins they can produce pose serious economic, environmental, and public health problems worldwide.

Lessons in Leadership: My Life in the US Army from World War II to Vietnam

by General John R. Deane Jr. edited by Jack C. Mason

John R. Deane Jr. (1919–2013) was born with all the advantages a man needs to succeed in a career in the US Army, and he capitalized on his many opportunities in spectacular fashion.

Thunder in the Argonne: A New History of America’s Greatest Battle

by Douglas V. Mastriano

In July 1918, sensing that the German Army had lost crucial momentum, Supreme Allied Commander Ferdinand Foch saw an opportunity to end the First World War.

Imaginative Conservatism: The Letters of Russell Kirk

edited by James E. Person Jr.

Russell Kirk (1918–1994) is renowned worldwide as one of the founders of postwar American conservatism.

Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places

by John I. Gilderbloom

Bright, vibrant, intriguing, and unique, chromatic homes are speckled across the world’s landscape.

Native Americans on Film: Conversations, Teaching, and Theory

edited by M. Elise Marubbio and Eric L. Buffalohead

The film industry and mainstream popular culture are notorious for promoting stereotypical images of Native Americans: the noble and ignoble savage, the pronoun-challenged sidekick, the ruthless warrior, the female drudge, the princess, the sexualized maiden, the drunk, and others.

Reagan and the World: Leadership and National Security, 1981–1989

edited by Bradley Lynn Coleman and Kyle Longley foreword by Jack Matlock Jr., James Graham Wilson, Beth Fischer, Ronald Granieri, James R. Locher III, Archie Brown, James Cooper, William Hitchcock, David F. Patton, Michael Schaller, Kyle Longley, Evan R. Ward, Charles BrowerIV, and Ryan Carpenter

Throughout his presidency, Ronald Reagan sought “peace through strength” during an era of historic change.

The Secret History of RDX: The Super-Explosive that Helped Win World War II

by Colin F. Baxter

During the early years of World War II, American ships crossing the Atlantic with oil and supplies were virtually defenseless against German U-boats. Bombs and torpedoes fitted with TNT barely made a dent in the tough steel plating that covered the hulls of Axis submarines and ships.

Rethinking the Civil War Era: Directions for Research

by Paul D. Escott

Arguably, no event since the American Revolution has had a greater impact on US history than the Civil War.

Ziegfeld and His Follies: A Biography of Broadway’s Greatest Producer

by Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

The name Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. (1867–1932) is synonymous with the decadent revues that the legendary impresario produced at the turn of the twentieth century.

The Mentelles: Mary Todd Lincoln, Henry Clay, and the Immigrant Family Who Educated Antebellum Kentucky

by Randolph Paul Runyon

Though they were not, as Charlotte claimed, refugees from the French Revolution, Augustus Waldemar and Charlotte Victoire Mentelle undoubtedly felt like exiles in their adopted hometown of Lexington, Kentucky—a settlement that was still a frontier town when they arrived in 1798.

Russell Kirk: American Conservative

by Bradley J. Birzer

Emerging from two decades of the Great Depression and the New Deal and facing the rise of radical ideologies abroad, the American Right seemed beaten, broken, and adrift in the early 1950s.

A Political Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois

edited by Nick Bromell with contributions by Charles Mills, Lewis R. Gordon, Anthony Reed, James E. Ford III, Melvin L. Rogers, Nick Bromell, Robert W. Williams, Alexander Livingston, Arash Davari, David Haekwon Kim, and Vijay Phulwani

Literary scholars and historians have long considered W. E. B. Du Bois (1868–1963) an extremely influential writer and a powerful cultural critic.

Blood in the Hills: A History of Violence in Appalachia

edited by Bruce E. Stewart with contributions byBruce E. Stewart, Kevin T. Barksdale, Kathryn Shively Meier, Tyler Boulware, John C. Inscoe, Katherine Ledford, Durwood Dunn, Bruce E. Stewart, Mary E. Engel, Rand Dotson, T.R.C. Hutton, Paul H. Rakes, Kevin Young, Richard D. Starnes, and Kenneth R. Bailey

To many antebellum Americans, Appalachia was a frightening wilderness of lawlessness, peril, robbers, and hidden dangers.

Lincoln’s Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America’s Greatest President

by Kathryn Canavan

When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln’s head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike.

Roy Wilkins: The Quiet Revolutionary and the NAACP

by Yvonne Ryan

Roy Wilkins (1901–1981) spent forty-six years of his life serving the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and led the organization for more than twenty years.

Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South

by Kristina DuRocher

White southerners recognized that the perpetuation of segregation required whites of all ages to uphold a strict social order—especially the young members of the next generation.

The Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy

by Pellom McDaniels III

Isaac Burns Murphy (1861–1896) was one of the most dynamic jockeys of his era.

An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee

edited by Aram Goudsouzian and Charles W. McKinney Jr.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, Memphis, Tennessee, had the largest metropolitan population of African Americans in the Mid-South region and served as a political hub for civic organizations and grassroots movements.

The Civil War Guerrilla: Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth

edited by Joseph M. Beilein Jr. and Matthew C. Hulbert

Most Americans are familiar with major Civil War battles such as Manassas (Bull Run), Shiloh, and Gettysburg, which have been extensively analyzed by generations of historians.

James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

by Sara Rzeszutek

James Jackson and Esther Cooper Jackson grew up understanding that opportunities came differently for blacks and whites, men and women, rich and poor.

Appalachia in Regional Context: Place Matters

edited by Dwight B. Billings and Ann E. Kingsolver with contributions by Barbara Ellen Smith, John Pickles, John Gaventa, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Carol A. Mason, Mary L. Gray, bell hooks, Rich Kirby, John Haywood, Ron Pen, Gina Caison, David A. Davis, Laura Hernandez-Ehrisman, Kent C. Ryden, and Emily Satterwhite

In an increasingly globalized world, place matters more than ever.