Newly Released Titles

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A Political Companion to James Baldwin

edited by Susan J. McWilliams with contributions by Susan J. McWilliams, Lawrie Balfour, P.J. Brendese, Susan J. McWilliams, Nicholas Buccola, George Shulman, Vincent Lloyd, Wilson Carey McWilliams, Joel Schlosser, Brian Norman, Ulf Schulenberg, Jack Turner, Lisa Beard, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Rachel Brahinsky

In seminal works such as Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, and The Fire Next Time, acclaimed author and social critic James Baldwin (1924–1987) expresses his profound belief that writers have the power to transform society, to engage the public, and to inspire and channel conversation to achieve lasting change.

The Art of Command: Military Leadership from George Washington to Colin Powell, second edition

edited by Harry S. Laver and Jeffrey J. Matthews foreword by H.R. McMaster

What essential leadership lessons do we learn by distilling the actions and ideas of great military commanders such as George Washington, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Colin Powell?

Barbara La Marr: The Girl Who Was Too Beautiful for Hollywood

by Sherri Snyder

Barbara La Marr’s (1896–1926) publicist once confessed: “There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr.

Harold Stassen: Eisenhower, the Cold War, and the Pursuit of Nuclear Disarmament

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

Harold Stassen (1907–2001) garnered accolades as the thirty-one-year-old “boy wonder” governor of Minnesota and quickly assumed a national role as aide to Admiral William Halsey Jr. during World War II. When Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected in 1952, Stassen was named director of the Mutual Security Administration and then became the president’s special assistant for disarmament.

Dying to Eat: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Food, Death, and the Afterlife

edited by Candi K. Cann with contributions by Emily Wu, Jung Eun Sophia Park, Joshua Graham, Lacy K. Crocker, Gordon Fuller, David Oualaalou, Christa Shusko, and Radikobo Ntsimane

Food has played a major role in funerary and memorial practices since the dawn of the human race.

Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.

Kentucky’s Rebel Press: Pro-Confederate Media and the Secession Crisis

by Berry Craig

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky.

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

Water in Kentucky: Natural History, Communities, and Conservation

edited by Brian D. Lee, Daniel I. Carey, and Alice L. Jones with contributions by Tricia Coakley, Jeffrey W. Stringer, Emma Whitt, Jamey Wiglesworth, Demetrio P. Zourarakis, Carol Wilson, Tanja N. Williamson, Kelly Taylor, Shaunna L. Scott, Jack Schieffer, Roger Recktenwald, Gary O'Dell, Zina Merkin, Stephanie McSpirit, Wuyang Hu, Carol Hanley, Jason Hale, Susan P. Hendricks, Amanda A. Gumbert, Michelle L. Guidugli, James C. Currens, Angela S. Crain, John R. Burch Jr., David R. Brown, Christopher D. Barton, Carmen T. Agouridis, Sam Adams, Brad D. Lee, and Stephen C. Richter

Home to sprawling Appalachian forests, rolling prairies, and the longest cave system in the world, Kentucky is among the most ecologically diverse states in the nation.

Kentucky's Last Cavalier: General William Preston, 1816-1887

by Peter J. Sehlinger

William Preston was a leading representative of Kentucky’s slaveholding, landed gentry, the group who dominated economic, political, and social life in the commonwealth before the Civil War.

A History of Blacks in Kentucky: From Slavery to Segregation, 1760-1891, Volume 1

by Marion B. Lucas

A History of Blacks in Kentucky traces the role of blacks from the early exploration and settlement of Kentucky to 1891, when African Americans gained freedom only to be faced with a segregated society.

Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox, 1900-1950

by James C. Klotter

This volume is the first comprehensive and in-depth history of Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century.

Roadside History: A Guide to Kentucky Highway Markers

edited by Melba Porter Hay and Thomas H. Appleton, Jr.

Published by the Kentucky Historical Society and distributed by the University Press of Kentucky We have all spied them as we blast down I-75 scanning the roadside for anything of interest or rolled past one while trying to find an elusive gas station in an unfamiliar small town.

Community Memories: A Glimpse of African American Life in Frankfort, Kentucky

by Winona L. Fletcher, Sheila Mason Burton, James E. Wallace, and Douglas A. Boyd

Community Memories is a fascinating look into life recalled by African Americans who consider Frankfort their home.

Footloose in Jacksonian America: Robert W. Scott and his Agrarian World

by Thomas D. Clark

In the fall of 1829, young Robert Wilmot Scott rode away from Frankfort, Kentucky, on a trip that would take him through nine states.

A History of Blacks in Kentucky: In Pursuit of Equality, 1890-1980, Volume 2

by George C Wright

Published by the Kentucky Historical Society & Distributed by the University Press of Kentucky This is the second part of a two-volume study which covers the entire spectrum of the black experience in Kentucky from earliest exploration and settlement to 1980.

Kentucky: Decades of Discord, 1865-1900

by Hambleton Tapp and James C. Klotter

" Published by the Kentucky Historical Society and Distributed by the University Press of Kentucky This period of Kentucky's history began with the unsettled society following the close of the Civil War, included bloody feuds, and closed with the tragic Goebel assassination.

A Girl's A Gun: Poems

by Rachel Danielle Peterson

Haunting and candid, A Girl’s A Gun introduces a poet whose bold voice merges heightened lyricism with compelling narrative.

Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? Murder, Mistrial, and Mystery

by Robert G. Lawson

On October 26, 1961, after an evening of studying with friends on the campus of Transylvania University, nineteen-year-old student Betty Gail Brown got into her car around midnight—presumably headed for home.

Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film

by Alan K. Rode

Academy Award–winning director Michael Curtiz (1886–1962)—whose best-known films include Casablanca (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Mildred Pierce (1945) and White Christmas (1954)—was in many ways the anti-auteur. During his unprecedented twenty-seven year tenure at Warner Bros.

Hitchhiker: Stories from the Kentucky Homefront

by Bob Thompson foreword by Roberta Simpson Brown

Growing up next door to his Granny’s country store in McCracken County, Kentucky, a very young Bob Thompson had unlimited access to the cold-drink box and shelves of candy.

Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine

by Kelley Fanto Deetz

In grocery store aisles and kitchens across the country, smiling images of “Aunt Jemima” and other historical and fictional black cooks can be found on various food products and in advertising.

The Beer Cheese Book

by Garin Pirnia

The ingredients are simple—beer, cheese, and spices—and the result is delicious.

Rereading Appalachia: Literacy, Place, and Cultural Resistance

edited by Sara Webb-Sunderhaus and Kim Donehower with contributions by Ryan Angus, Krista Bryson, Gregory Griffey, Emma Howes, Josh Iddings, Peter Mortensen, Nathan Shepley, Todd Snyder, and Kathryn Trauth Taylor

Appalachia faces overwhelming challenges that plague many rural areas across the country, including poorly funded schools, stagnant economic development, corrupt political systems, poverty, and drug abuse.

Appalachia Revisited: New Perspectives on Place, Tradition, and Progress

edited by William Schumann and Rebecca Adkins Fletcher

Known for its dramatic beauty and valuable natural resources, Appalachia has undergone significant technological, economic, political, and environmental changes in recent decades.