Newly Released Titles

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Charles Walters: The Director Who Made Hollywood Dance

by Brent Phillips

From the trolley scene in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’s last dance on the silver screen (The Barkleys of Broadway, 1949) to Judy Garland’s timeless, tuxedo-clad performance of “Get Happy” (Summer Stock, 1950), Charles Walters staged the iconic musical sequences of Hollywood’s golden age.

Harry Langdon: King of Silent Comedy

by Gabriella Oldham and Mabel Langdon foreword by Harry Langdon Jr.

Among silent film comedians, three names stand out—Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd—but Harry Langdon indisputably deserves to sit among them as the fourth “king.” In films such as The Strong Man (1926) and Long Pants (1927), Langdon parlayed his pantomime talents, expressive eyes, and childlike innocence into silent-era stardom.

Ranger: A Soldier's Life

by Colonel Ralph Puckett, USA (Ret.) with D. K. R. Crosswell afterword by General David H. Petraeus, USA (Ret.)

On November 25, 1950, during one of the toughest battles of the Korean War, the US Eighth Army Ranger Company seized and held the strategically important Hill 205 overlooking the Chongchon River.

US Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton

edited by Andrew Johnstone and Andrew Priest with contributions by Andrew Johnstone, Andrew Priest, J. Simon Rofe, Michael F. Hopkins, Steven Casey, Scott Lucas, Sylvia Ellis, Thomas Tunstall Allcock, Sandra Scanlon, Thomas Alan Schwartz, Andrew Priest, Robert Mason, David Ryan, Robert A. Strong, John Dumbrell, and Robert David Johnson

While domestic issues loom large in voters’ minds during American presidential elections, matters of foreign policy have consistently shaped candidates and their campaigns.

Improvising Out Loud: My Life Teaching Hollywood How to Act

by Jeff Corey with Emily Corey foreword by Leonard Nimoy afterword by Janet Neipris

Jeff Corey (1914–2002) made a name for himself in the 1940s as a character actor in films like Superman and the Mole Men (1951), Joan of Arc (1948), and The Killers (1946). Everything changed in 1951, when he was summoned before the House Un-American Activities Committee.