Newly Released Titles

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Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.

Kentucky’s Rebel Press: Pro-Confederate Media and the Secession Crisis

by Berry Craig

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky.

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

Water in Kentucky: Natural History, Communities, and Conservation

edited by Brian D. Lee, Daniel I. Carey, and Alice L. Jones with contributions by Tricia Coakley, Jeffrey W. Stringer, Emma Whitt, Jamey Wiglesworth, Demetrio P. Zourarakis, Carol Wilson, Tanja N. Williamson, Kelly Taylor, Shaunna L. Scott, Jack Schieffer, Roger Recktenwald, Gary O'Dell, Zina Merkin, Stephanie McSpirit, Wuyang Hu, Carol Hanley, Jason Hale, Susan P. Hendricks, Amanda A. Gumbert, Michelle L. Guidugli, James C. Currens, Angela S. Crain, John R. Burch Jr., David R. Brown, Christopher D. Barton, Carmen T. Agouridis, Sam Adams, Brad D. Lee, and Stephen C. Richter

Home to sprawling Appalachian forests, rolling prairies, and the longest cave system in the world, Kentucky is among the most ecologically diverse states in the nation.

Kentucky's Last Cavalier: General William Preston, 1816-1887

by Peter J. Sehlinger

William Preston was a leading representative of Kentucky’s slaveholding, landed gentry, the group who dominated economic, political, and social life in the commonwealth before the Civil War.