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The Philosophy of TV Noir

by Steven M. Sanders and Aeon J. Skoble

Availableweb pdf$35.00s 978-0-8131-5678-1
Availablecloth$35.00s 978-0-8131-2449-0
The Philosophy of Popular Culture
288 pages  Pubdate: 10/17/2014  6 x 9  

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The influence of classic film noir on the style and substance of television in the 1950s and 1960s has persisted to the present day. Its pervasiveness suggests the vitality of the noir depiction of human experience and the importance of TV for transmitting the legacy of film noir and producing new forms of noir. Noir television is also noteworthy for its capacity to raise philosophical questions about the nature of the human condition. Drawing from the fields of philosophy, media studies, and literature, the contributors to The Philosophy of TV Noir illuminate the best of noir television, including such shows as Dragnet, The Fugitive, Miami Vice, The X-Files, CSI, and 24.

This book features a wide diversity of essays, written from many provocative perspectives on the nature of TV noir as presented in various television series. Viewed through the lenses of philosophy, history, and other disciplines, it will appeal to both scholars and intelligent non-specialists. Given the centrality of television as an organ of popular culture, this book is profoundly important to understanding the legacy of film noir. This anthology is a natural, necessary, and BRILLIANT addition to the series. -- Chris Matthew Sciabarra, author of Total Freedom

Given the centrality of television as an organ of popular culture, this book is profoundly important to understanding the legacy of film noir. This anthology is a natural, necessary, and BRILLIANT addition to the series. -- Chris Matthew Sciabarra, author of Total Freedom

The Philosophy of TV Noir is insightful and accessible, offering an introduction to philosophical wisdom that is fun and weighty through the inherently interesting genre of Noir. -- Jacob M. Held, co-editor of James Bond and Philosophy: Questions are Forever

The contributors’ thoughtful inquiry and analysis of these canonical programs draws on staple philosophical concepts- moral ambiguity, nihilism, existentialism, postmodernism, and so on. The resulting discussions are lucid and informative, and they adroitly balance film theory and philosophy. -- Choice