• Home
  • We Shall Return!
We Shall Return!

We Shall Return!

MacArthur's Commanders and the Defeat of Japan, 1942-1945

Edited by William M. Leary

Contributions by Stanley L. Falk, D. M. Horner, William M. Leary, Herman S. Wolk, Gerald E. Wheeler, Jay Luvaas, John F. Shortal, Donald M. Goldstein and Paolo E. Coletta

Published by: The University Press of Kentucky

320 Pages, 6.00 x 9.25 in, 31 b&w photos, 8 maps

  • Paperback
  • 9780813191058
  • Published: November 2004

$45.00

BUY

They were the forgotten commanders of World War II. While the names of Bradley and Patton became household words for Americans, few could identify Krueger or Eichelberger. They served under General Douglas MacArthur, a military genius with an enormous ego who dominated publicity from the Southwest Pacific during the American advance from Australia, through New Guinea, to the Philippines. While people at home read about the great victories that were won by "MacArthur's navy" and "MacArthur's air force," his subordinates labored in obscurity, fearful lest attention from the press lead to their replacement.

Historians too have paid little attention to the men who fought so well in the far reaches of the Pacific, and not a single biography has appeared in the decades since V-J Day. Yet General Blamey played a key role in the early battles of New Guinea. Generals Krueger and Eichelberger led American armies to major victories over the Japanese. General Kenney was one of the foremost air strategists of the war, while few airmen could match General Whitehead's tactical brilliance. Admiral Kinkaid took a crucial part in one of the greatest naval engagements in history. Admiral Barbey was an acknowledged master of amphibious warfare.

We Shall Return! addresses a serious shortcoming in the literature of World War II. Revealed for the first time is the full extent of the contributions made by MacArthur's commanders to the defeat of the Japanese. As the authors of these essays so ably demonstrate, many of MacArthur's bold decisions and innovative tactics were urged upon him by his subordinates. Clearly, these men deserve more credit for his successes than they have received.