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For Slavery and Union: Benjamin Buckner and Kentucky Loyalties in the Civil War

by Patrick A. Lewis

Benjamin Forsythe Buckner (1836–1901) faced a dire choice as the flames of Civil War threatened his native Kentucky.

Southern History on Screen: Race and Rights, 1976-2016

edited by Bryan M. Jack with contributions by Oliver Gruner, Daniel Farrell, Erik Alexander, Caroline Schroeter, Todd Simpson, Kwakiutl Dreher, Megan Hunt, Gene Kelly, and Tatiana Prorokova

Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach mass audiences, films represent the power to influence and shape the public’s understanding of our country’s past, creating lasting images—both real and imagined—in American culture.

The Struggle for Cooperation: Liberated France and the American Military, 1944–1946

by Robert L. Fuller

During World War II, French citizens expressed that the German occupiers behaved more “correctly” than the American combat troops who replaced them.

Reformers to Radicals: The Appalachian Volunteers and the War on Poverty

by Thomas Kiffmeyer

In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy challenged Americans to do something for their country.

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

The Politics of Richard Wright: Perspectives on Resistance

edited by Jane Anna Gordon and Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh with contributions by Richard Wright, Lewis R. Gordon, Cedric Robinson, Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh, Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, Floyd W. Hayes III, Paul Gilroy, Lori Marso, Tommy J. Curry, Richard Wright, Kevin Gaines, Dorothy Stringer, Richard Wright, William Dow, Perry S. Moskowitz, James B. Haile III, Richard Wright, Abdul R. JanMohamed, Laura Grattan, and Jane Anna Gordon

A pillar of African American literature, Richard Wright is one of the most celebrated and controversial authors in American history.

The Struggle Is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation

by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson.

A New History of Kentucky, second edition

by James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state.

Thomas C. Mann: President Johnson, the Cold War, and the Restructuring of Latin American Foreign Policy

by Thomas Tunstall Allcock

Lyndon Johnson was often blamed for abandoning Kennedy’s vision of development and progress in Latin America in favor of his own domestic concerns: anti-communism and economic stability.

Virtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry’s Sustainable Forms

by Jeffrey Bilbro

For over fifty years, Wendell Berry has argued that our most pressing ecological and cultural need is a renewed formal intelligence—a mode of thinking and acting that fosters the health of the earth and its beings.

Paul Rusch in Postwar Japan: Evangelism, Rural Development, and the Battle against Communism

by Andrew T. McDonald and Verlaine Stoner McDonald

Paul Rusch first traveled from Louisville, Kentucky, to Tokyo in 1925 to help rebuild YMCA facilities in the wake of the Great Kanto earthquake.

Amreekiya: A Novel

by Lena Mahmoud

Isra Shadi, a twenty-one-year-old woman of mixed Palestinian and white descent, lives in California with her paternal amu (uncle), amtu (aunt), and cousins after the death of her mother and abandonment by her father at a young age.

Clarence Brown: Hollywood's Forgotten Master

by Gwenda Young foreword by Kevin Brownlow

Greta Garbo proclaimed him as her favorite director.

The Forgotten Front: The Eastern Theater of World War I, 1914 - 1915

edited by Gerhard P. Gross translated by Janice W. Ancker with contributions by Gerhard P. Gross, Hew Strachan, Stig Förster, Gerhard P. Gross, Boris Khavkin, Günther Kronenbitter, Jörg Baberowski, Piotr Szlanta, Hubertus F. Jahn, Peter Hoeres, Eva Horn, Birgit Menzel, Igor Narskij, Hans-Erich Volkmann, Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, Ranier Rother, Christine Beil, Kristiane Janeke, Ranier Rother, Gundula Bavendamm, and Rüdiger Bergien

Although much has been written about the Western Front in World War I, little attention has been given to developments in the east, especially during the crucial period of 1914–1915. Not only did these events have a significant impact on the fighting and outcome of the battles in the west, but all the major combatants in the east ultimately suffered collapses of their political systems with enormous consequences for the future events.

College for the Commonwealth: A Case for Higher Education in American Democracy

by Michael T. Benson and Hal R. Boyd foreword by E. Gordon Gee

In the past decade, states across the nation have cut higher education spending per student by more than 15 percent.

Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing's Most Famous Cold Case

by Milton C. Toby

It was a cold and foggy February night in 1983 when a group of armed thieves crept onto Ballymany Stud, near The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland, to steal Shergar, one of the Thoroughbred industry’s most renowned stallions.

Mend: Poems

by Kwoya Fagin Maples

The inventor of the speculum, J. Marion Sims, is celebrated as the “father of modern gynecology,” and a memorial at his birthplace honors “his service to suffering women, empress and slave alike.

Jarmila Novotná: My Life in Song

by Jarmila Novotná edited by William V. Madison foreword by Brian Kellow

A legendary beauty, hailed as one of the greatest singing actors of her time, Jarmila Novotná (1907–1994) was an internationally known opera soprano from the former Czechoslovakia.

War and Remembrance: The Story of the American Battle Monuments Commission

by Thomas H. Conner foreword by James Scott Wheeler

"No soldier could ask for a sweeter resting place than on the field of glory where he fell.

Pershing's Tankers: Personal Accounts of the AEF Tank Corps in World War I

edited by Lawrence M. Kaplan foreword by Dale E. Wilson

After the United States declared war against Germany in April 1917, the US Army established the Tank Corps to help break the deadlock of trench warfare in France during World War I. The army envisioned having a large tank force by 1919, but when the war ended in November 1918, only three tank battalions had participated in combat operations.

Drawing the Line: The Untold Story of the Animation Unions from Bosko to Bart Simpson

by Tom Sito

Some of the most beloved characters in film and television inhabit two-dimensional worlds that spring from the fertile imaginations of talented animators.

The Philosophy of War Films

edited by David LaRocca with contributions by David LaRocca, Fredric Jameson, Garrett Stewart, Stacey Peebles, Joshua Gooch, Burke Hilsabeck, Garry L. Hagberg, Robert Burgoyne, Inger S. B. Brodey, Holger Pötzsch, Andrew Fiala, K. L. Evans, Robert Pippin, Lawrence F. Rhu, and Elisabeth Bronfen

Wars have played a momentous role in shaping the course of human history.

Elkhorn: Evolution of a Kentucky Landscape

by Richard Taylor

When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as “Taylor’s Folly.

The Myth and Reality of German Warfare: Operational Thinking from Moltke the Elder to Heusinger

by Gerhard P. Gross edited by David T. Zabecki foreword by Robert M. Citino

Surrounded by potential adversaries, nineteenth-century Prussia and twentieth-century Germany faced the formidable prospect of multifront wars and wars of attrition.

Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia

by Bruce E. Stewart

Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries.

World Politics on Screen: Understanding International Relations through Popular Culture

by Mark Sachleben

Increasingly resistant to lessons on international politics, society often turns to television and film to engage the subject.

North Korean Military Proliferation in the Middle East and Africa: Enabling Violence and Instability

by Bruce E. Bechtol Jr.

North Korea has posed a threat to stability in Northeast Asia for decades.

Advance and Destroy: Patton as Commander in the Bulge

by John Nelson Rickard foreword by Roger Cirillo

In the winter of 1944–1945, Hitler sought to divide Allied forces in the heavily forested Ardennes region of Luxembourg and Belgium.

The Cold War at Home and Abroad: Domestic Politics and US Foreign Policy since 1945

edited by Andrew L. Johns and Mitchell B. Lerner with contributions by Andrew L. Johns, Autumn Lass, David L. Prentice, Christopher Foss, Daniel G. Hummel, Henry Maar, Tizoc Chavez, Hideaki Kami, Amanda C. Demmer, Rasmus Sinding Søndergaard, Michael Brenes, Simon Miles, and Mitchell B. Lerner

From President Truman’s use of a domestic propaganda agency to Ronald Reagan’s handling of the Soviet Union during his 1984 reelection campaign, the American political system has consistently exerted a profound effect on the country’s foreign policies.

Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier’s Memoir

by General John R. Galvin USA (Ret.) foreword by General David H. Petraeus USA (Ret.)

When four-star general John Rogers Galvin retired from the US Army after forty-four years of distinguished service in 1992, the Washington Post hailed him as a man “without peer among living generals.

Jacob L. Devers: A General's Life

by James Scott Wheeler foreword by Rick Atkinson

General Jacob L. “Jake” Devers (1897–1979) was one of only two officers—the other was Omar C. Bradley—to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944–1945 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany.

Paving the Way for Reagan: The Influence of Conservative Media on US Foreign Policy

by Laurence R. Jurdem

From 1964 to 1980, the United States was buffeted by a variety of international crises, including the nation’s defeat in Vietnam, the growing aggression of the Soviet Union, and Washington’s inability to free the fifty two American hostages held by Islamic extremists in Iran.

Stuntwomen: The Untold Hollywood Story

by Mollie Gregory

They’ve traded punches in knockdown brawls, crashed biplanes through barns, and raced to the rescue in fast cars.

A Political Companion to Frederick Douglass

edited by Neil Roberts with contributions by Paul Gilroy, Bernard Boxill, Margaret Kohn, Angela Y. Davis, Robert Gooding-Williams, Jack Turner, Ange-Marie Alfaro, Nicholas Buccola, Peter C. Myers, Vincent Lloyd, Anne Norton, Herbert Storing, Jason Frank, and Nick Bromell

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was a prolific writer and public speaker whose impact on American literature and history has been long studied by historians and literary critics.

Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men: A Reader's Companion

by Jonathan S. Cullick

Robert Penn Warren is one of the best-known and most consequential Kentucky writers of the twentieth century and the only American writer to have won three Pulitzers in two different genres.

Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader

by Bobbie Ann Mason Introduction by George Saunders

Bobbie Ann Mason burst onto the American literary scene during a renaissance of short fiction that Raymond Carver called a “literary phenomenon.

A Guide to Cyanobacteria: Identification and Impact

by Mark A. Nienaber and Miriam Steinitz-Kannan

Blue-green algae (also known as cyanobacteria) and the toxins they can produce pose serious economic, environmental, and public health problems worldwide.

Lessons in Leadership: My Life in the US Army from World War II to Vietnam

by General John R. Deane Jr. edited by Jack C. Mason

John R. Deane Jr. (1919–2013) was born with all the advantages a man needs to succeed in a career in the US Army, and he capitalized on his many opportunities in spectacular fashion.

Thunder in the Argonne: A New History of America’s Greatest Battle

by Douglas V. Mastriano

In July 1918, sensing that the German Army had lost crucial momentum, Supreme Allied Commander Ferdinand Foch saw an opportunity to end the First World War.

Imaginative Conservatism: The Letters of Russell Kirk

edited by James E. Person Jr.

Russell Kirk (1918–1994) is renowned worldwide as one of the founders of postwar American conservatism.

Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places

by John I. Gilderbloom

Bright, vibrant, intriguing, and unique, chromatic homes are speckled across the world’s landscape.

Native Americans on Film: Conversations, Teaching, and Theory

edited by M. Elise Marubbio and Eric L. Buffalohead

The film industry and mainstream popular culture are notorious for promoting stereotypical images of Native Americans: the noble and ignoble savage, the pronoun-challenged sidekick, the ruthless warrior, the female drudge, the princess, the sexualized maiden, the drunk, and others.

Reagan and the World: Leadership and National Security, 1981–1989

edited by Bradley Lynn Coleman and Kyle Longley foreword by Jack Matlock Jr., James Graham Wilson, Beth Fischer, Ronald Granieri, James R. Locher III, Archie Brown, James Cooper, William Hitchcock, David F. Patton, Michael Schaller, Kyle Longley, Evan R. Ward, Charles BrowerIV, and Ryan Carpenter

Throughout his presidency, Ronald Reagan sought “peace through strength” during an era of historic change.

The Secret History of RDX: The Super-Explosive that Helped Win World War II

by Colin F. Baxter

During the early years of World War II, American ships crossing the Atlantic with oil and supplies were virtually defenseless against German U-boats. Bombs and torpedoes fitted with TNT barely made a dent in the tough steel plating that covered the hulls of Axis submarines and ships.

Ziegfeld and His Follies: A Biography of Broadway’s Greatest Producer

by Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

The name Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. (1867–1932) is synonymous with the decadent revues that the legendary impresario produced at the turn of the twentieth century.

The Mentelles: Mary Todd Lincoln, Henry Clay, and the Immigrant Family Who Educated Antebellum Kentucky

by Randolph Paul Runyon

Though they were not, as Charlotte claimed, refugees from the French Revolution, Augustus Waldemar and Charlotte Victoire Mentelle undoubtedly felt like exiles in their adopted hometown of Lexington, Kentucky—a settlement that was still a frontier town when they arrived in 1798.

Russell Kirk: American Conservative

by Bradley J. Birzer

Emerging from two decades of the Great Depression and the New Deal and facing the rise of radical ideologies abroad, the American Right seemed beaten, broken, and adrift in the early 1950s.

Blood in the Hills: A History of Violence in Appalachia

edited by Bruce E. Stewart with contributions byBruce E. Stewart, Kevin T. Barksdale, Kathryn Shively Meier, Tyler Boulware, John C. Inscoe, Katherine Ledford, Durwood Dunn, Bruce E. Stewart, Mary E. Engel, Rand Dotson, T.R.C. Hutton, Paul H. Rakes, Kevin Young, Richard D. Starnes, and Kenneth R. Bailey

To many antebellum Americans, Appalachia was a frightening wilderness of lawlessness, peril, robbers, and hidden dangers.

Lincoln’s Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America’s Greatest President

by Kathryn Canavan

When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln’s head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike.

Roy Wilkins: The Quiet Revolutionary and the NAACP

by Yvonne Ryan

Roy Wilkins (1901–1981) spent forty-six years of his life serving the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and led the organization for more than twenty years.

Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South

by Kristina DuRocher

White southerners recognized that the perpetuation of segregation required whites of all ages to uphold a strict social order—especially the young members of the next generation.

The Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy

by Pellom McDaniels III

Isaac Burns Murphy (1861–1896) was one of the most dynamic jockeys of his era.

Rethinking the Civil War Era: Directions for Research

by Paul D. Escott

Arguably, no event since the American Revolution has had a greater impact on US history than the Civil War.

The Civil War Guerrilla: Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth

edited by Joseph M. Beilein Jr. and Matthew C. Hulbert

Most Americans are familiar with major Civil War battles such as Manassas (Bull Run), Shiloh, and Gettysburg, which have been extensively analyzed by generations of historians.

An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee

edited by Aram Goudsouzian and Charles W. McKinney Jr.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, Memphis, Tennessee, had the largest metropolitan population of African Americans in the Mid-South region and served as a political hub for civic organizations and grassroots movements.

James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

by Sara Rzeszutek

James Jackson and Esther Cooper Jackson grew up understanding that opportunities came differently for blacks and whites, men and women, rich and poor.

A Political Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois

edited by Nick Bromell with contributions by Charles Mills, Lewis R. Gordon, Anthony Reed, James E. Ford III, Melvin L. Rogers, Nick Bromell, Robert W. Williams, Alexander Livingston, Arash Davari, David Haekwon Kim, and Vijay Phulwani

Literary scholars and historians have long considered W. E. B. Du Bois (1868–1963) an extremely influential writer and a powerful cultural critic.

Appalachia in Regional Context: Place Matters

edited by Dwight B. Billings and Ann E. Kingsolver with contributions by Barbara Ellen Smith, John Pickles, John Gaventa, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Carol A. Mason, Mary L. Gray, bell hooks, Rich Kirby, John Haywood, Ron Pen, Gina Caison, David A. Davis, Laura Hernandez-Ehrisman, Kent C. Ryden, and Emily Satterwhite

In an increasingly globalized world, place matters more than ever.

Just War Reconsidered: Strategy, Ethics, and Theory

by James M. Dubik foreword by General Martin Dempsey, USA (Ret.)

In the seminal Just and Unjust Wars, Michael Walzer famously considered the ethics of modern warfare, examining the moral issues that arise before, during, and after conflict.

The Birds of Opulence

by Crystal Wilkinson

From the critically acclaimed, award-winning author of Blackberries, Blackberries and Water Street comes an astonishing new novel.

Make Way for Her: And Other Stories

by Katie Cortese

A girl afflicted with pyrokinesis tries to control her fire-starting long enough to go to a dance with a boy she likes.

Black Bone: 25 Years of the Affrilachian Poets

edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden

The Appalachian region stretches from Mississippi to New York, encompassing rural areas as well as cities from Birmingham to Pittsburgh.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights Activism in the North

edited by Mary Lou Finley, Bernard LaFayette Jr., James R. Ralph Jr., and Pam Smith foreword by Clayborne Carson

Six months after the Selma to Montgomery marches and just weeks after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a group from Martin Luther King Jr.’s staff arrived in Chicago, eager to apply his nonviolent approach to social change in a northern city.

Forty Minutes to Glory: Inside the Kentucky Wildcats’ 1978 Championship Season

by Doug Brunk forewords by Larry Vaught and Tom Leach featuring chapters by Jack Givens, Joe B. Hall, and others

“Winning a national title . . . winning it at Kentucky?

Kentucky Confederates: Secession, Civil War, and the Jackson Purchase

by Berry Craig

During the Civil War, the majority of Kentuckians supported the Union under the leadership of Henry Clay, but one part of the state presented a striking exception.

Harold Stassen: Eisenhower, the Cold War, and the Pursuit of Nuclear Disarmament

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

Harold Stassen (1907–2001) garnered accolades as the thirty-one-year-old “boy wonder” governor of Minnesota and quickly assumed a national role as aide to Admiral William Halsey Jr. during World War II. When Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected in 1952, Stassen was named director of the Mutual Security Administration and then became the president’s special assistant for disarmament.

The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable

by Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier edited by Carolyn Woodward

Before Jane Austen’s novels explored heroines in English society, writers Sarah Fielding and Jane Collier dared to provide commentary on gender and education through self-conscious narratives.

Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.

Power versus Law in Modern China: Cities, Courts, and the Communist Party

by Qiang Fang and Xiaobing Li

Today 700 million Chinese citizens—more than fifty-four percent of the population—live in cities.

Kentucky’s Rebel Press: Pro-Confederate Media and the Secession Crisis

by Berry Craig

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky.

Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans

by James W. Pardew

The wars that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s were the deadliest European conflicts since World War II. The violence escalated to the point of genocide when, over the course of ten days in July 1995, Serbian troops under the command of General Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 unarmed men and boys who had sought refuge at a UN safe-haven in Srebrenica.

The Art of Command: Military Leadership from George Washington to Colin Powell, second edition

edited by Harry S. Laver and Jeffrey J. Matthews foreword by H.R. McMaster

What essential leadership lessons do we learn by distilling the actions and ideas of great military commanders such as George Washington, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Colin Powell?

Barbara La Marr: The Girl Who Was Too Beautiful for Hollywood

by Sherri Snyder

Barbara La Marr’s (1896–1926) publicist once confessed: “There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr.

Dying to Eat: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Food, Death, and the Afterlife

edited by Candi K. Cann with contributions by Emily Wu, Jung Eun Sophia Park, Joshua Graham, Lacy K. Crocker, Gordon Fuller, David Oualaalou, Christa Shusko, and Radikobo Ntsimane

Food has played a major role in funerary and memorial practices since the dawn of the human race.

Water in Kentucky: Natural History, Communities, and Conservation

edited by Brian D. Lee, Daniel I. Carey, and Alice L. Jones with contributions by Tricia Coakley, Jeffrey W. Stringer, Emma Whitt, Jamey Wiglesworth, Demetrio P. Zourarakis, Carol Wilson, Tanja N. Williamson, Kelly Taylor, Shaunna L. Scott, Jack Schieffer, Roger Recktenwald, Gary O'Dell, Zina Merkin, Stephanie McSpirit, Wuyang Hu, Carol Hanley, Jason Hale, Susan P. Hendricks, Amanda A. Gumbert, Michelle L. Guidugli, James C. Currens, Angela S. Crain, John R. Burch Jr., David R. Brown, Christopher D. Barton, Carmen T. Agouridis, Sam Adams, Brad D. Lee, and Stephen C. Richter

Home to sprawling Appalachian forests, rolling prairies, and the longest cave system in the world, Kentucky is among the most ecologically diverse states in the nation.

A Political Companion to James Baldwin

edited by Susan J. McWilliams with contributions by Susan J. McWilliams, Lawrie Balfour, P.J. Brendese, Susan J. McWilliams, Nicholas Buccola, George Shulman, Vincent Lloyd, Wilson Carey McWilliams, Joel Schlosser, Brian Norman, Ulf Schulenberg, Jack Turner, Lisa Beard, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Rachel Brahinsky

In seminal works such as Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, and The Fire Next Time, acclaimed author and social critic James Baldwin (1924–1987) expresses his profound belief that writers have the power to transform society, to engage the public, and to inspire and channel conversation to achieve lasting change.

Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? Murder, Mistrial, and Mystery

by Robert G. Lawson

On October 26, 1961, after an evening of studying with friends on the campus of Transylvania University, nineteen-year-old student Betty Gail Brown got into her car around midnight—presumably headed for home.

Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film

by Alan K. Rode

Academy Award–winning director Michael Curtiz (1886–1962)—whose best-known films include Casablanca (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Mildred Pierce (1945) and White Christmas (1954)—was in many ways the anti-auteur. During his unprecedented twenty-seven year tenure at Warner Bros.

Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine

by Kelley Fanto Deetz

In grocery store aisles and kitchens across the country, smiling images of “Aunt Jemima” and other historical and fictional black cooks can be found on various food products and in advertising.

The Beer Cheese Book

by Garin Pirnia

The ingredients are simple—beer, cheese, and spices—and the result is delicious.

Rereading Appalachia: Literacy, Place, and Cultural Resistance

edited by Sara Webb-Sunderhaus and Kim Donehower with contributions by Ryan Angus, Krista Bryson, Gregory Griffey, Emma Howes, Josh Iddings, Peter Mortensen, Nathan Shepley, Todd Snyder, and Kathryn Trauth Taylor

Appalachia faces overwhelming challenges that plague many rural areas across the country, including poorly funded schools, stagnant economic development, corrupt political systems, poverty, and drug abuse.

Appalachia Revisited: New Perspectives on Place, Tradition, and Progress

edited by William Schumann and Rebecca Adkins Fletcher

Known for its dramatic beauty and valuable natural resources, Appalachia has undergone significant technological, economic, political, and environmental changes in recent decades.

A Girl's A Gun: Poems

by Rachel Danielle Peterson

Haunting and candid, A Girl’s A Gun introduces a poet whose bold voice merges heightened lyricism with compelling narrative.

Hitchhiker: Stories from the Kentucky Homefront

by Bob Thompson foreword by Roberta Simpson Brown

Growing up next door to his Granny’s country store in McCracken County, Kentucky, a very young Bob Thompson had unlimited access to the cold-drink box and shelves of candy.

James Still: A Life

by Carol Boggess

James Still (1906–2001) first achieved national recognition in the 1930s as a poet, and he remains one of the most beloved and important writers in Appalachian literature.

You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Interviews with Stars from Hollywood’s Golden Era

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

Journalists James Bawden and Ron Miller spent their careers interviewing the greatest stars of Hollywood’s golden age.

Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

James Bawden: Seeing the way people behave when they’re around you, is it still fun being Cary Grant?

Irvin S. Cobb: The Rise and Fall of an American Humorist

by William E. Ellis

“Humor is merely tragedy standing on its head with its pants torn.

The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry

by Jane Gentry edited by Julia Johnson

Jane Gentry (1941–2014) possessed an uncanny ability to spin quietly expansive and wise verses from small details, objects, and remembered moments.

Architect of Air Power: General Laurence S. Kuter and the Birth of the US Air Force

by Brian D. Laslie

At age 36, Laurence S. Kuter (1905–1979) became the youngest general officer since William T. Sherman.

Anne Bancroft: A Life

by Douglass K. Daniel

“Mrs. Robinson, you’re trying to seduce me. Aren’t you?

Lossberg's War: The World War I Memoirs of a German Chief of Staff

by Fritz von Lossberg edited by David T. Zabecki and Dieter J. Biedekarken foreword by Holger H. Herwig

General Fritz von Lossberg (1868–1942) directed virtually all the major German defensive battles on the Western Front during the First World War.

At the Decisive Point in the Sinai: Generalship in the Yom Kippur War

by Jacob Even, IDF (Ret.) and Simcha B. Maoz, IDF (Ret.)

The Yom Kippur War pitted Israel against Syria in the north and Egypt in the south in October 1973.

Forward with Patton: The World War II Diary of Colonel Robert S. Allen

by Robert S. Allen edited by John Nelson Rickard

Soldier, journalist, and Soviet spy Robert S. Allen (1900–1981) was a deeply controversial figure.

Insurrections: Stories

by Rion Amilcar Scott

A suicidal father looks to an older neighbor—and the Cookie Monster—for salvation and sanctuary as his life begins to unravel.

Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis

by Keona K. Ervin

Like most of the nation during the 1930s, St. Louis, Missouri, was caught in the stifling grip of the Great Depression.

Rückzug: The German Retreat from France, 1944

by Joachim Ludewig edited by David T. Zabecki

The Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, marked a critical turning point in the European theater of World War II. The massive landing on France’s coast had been meticulously planned for three years, and the Allies anticipated a quick and decisive defeat of the German forces.

For Brotherhood and Duty: The Civil War History of the West Point Class of 1862

by Brian R. McEnany

During the tense months leading up to the American Civil War, the cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point continued their education even as the nation threatened to dissolve around them.

Order in Chaos: The Memoirs of General of Panzer Troops Hermann Balck

by Hermann Balck Edited and Translated by Major General David T. Zabecki, USA (Ret.) and Lieutenant Colonel Dieter J. Biedekarken, USA (Ret.) foreword by Carlo D'Este

German general Hermann Balck (1897–1982) was considered to be one of World War II’s greatest battlefield commanders.

The Christmas Truce: Myth, Memory, and the First World War

by Terri Blom Crocker foreword by Peter Grant

In late December 1914, German and British soldiers on the western front initiated a series of impromptu, unofficial ceasefires.