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Phantoms of Old Louisville: Ghostly Tales from America's Most Haunted Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

Haunts of Old Louisville: Gilded Age Ghosts and Haunted Mansions in America's Spookiest Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

Ghosts of Old Louisville: True Stories of Hauntings in America's Largest Victorian Neighborhood

by David Domine

Old Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, is the third-largest National Preservation District in the United States and the largest Victorian-era neighborhood in the country.

A Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor

edited by Henry T. Edmondson III with contributions by John Sikes Jr., Benjamin B. Alexander, Michael L. Schroeder, Margaret Earley Whitt, George Piggford, Sarah Gordon, Ralph Wood, Marc Bosco, Farrell O'Gorman, Gary Cuiba, Henry T. Edmondson III, John Roos, Christina Bieber-Lake, John F. Desmond, and Marion Montgomery

Acclaimed author and Catholic thinker Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964) penned two novels, two collections of short stories, various essays, and numerous book reviews over the course of her life.

Wars of Modern Babylon: A History of the Iraqi Army from 1921 to 2003

by Colonel Pesach Malovany, IDF (Ret.) introductions by Amatzia Baram and Kevin M. Woods forewords by Lt. General Amnon Lipkin-Shahak, IDF (Ret.) and Major General Ya’akov Amidror, IDF (Ret.)

As long as there have been wars, victors have written the prevailing histories of the world’s conflicts.

A Political Companion to Philip Roth

edited by Claudia Franziska Brühwiler and Lee Trepanier with contributions by Lee Trepanier, Claudia Franziska Brühwiler, Philip Roth, Aimee Pozorski, Claudia Franziska Brühwiler, Simon Stow, Michael G. Festl, Louis Gordon, Matthew Shipe, Till Kinzel, Yael Maurer, Debra Shostak, Brett Ashley Kaplan, and Andy Connolly

Philip Roth is widely acknowledged as one of the twentieth century’s most prolific and acclaimed writers.

Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity

by Albert W. A. Schmid foreword by Loreal “Butcher Babe” Gavin photographs by Jessica Ebelhar

Burgoo, barbecue, and bourbon have long been acknowledged as a trinity of good taste in Kentucky.

Remembering The Battle of the Crater: War as Murder

by Kevin M. Levin

The battle of the Crater is known as one of the Civil War’s bloodiest struggles—a Union loss with combined casualties of 5,000, many of whom were members of the United States Colored Troops (USCT) under Union Brigadier General Edward Ferrero.

Living Sustainably: What Intentional Communities Can Teach Us about Democracy, Simplicity, and Nonviolence

by A. Whitney Sanford

In light of concerns about food and human health, fraying social ties, economic uncertainty, and rampant consumerism, some people are foregoing a hurried, distracted existence and embracing a mindful way of living.

The Dream Is Lost: Voting Rights and the Politics of Race in Richmond, Virginia

by Julian Maxwell Hayter

Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history.

Wendell Berry and Higher Education: Cultivating Virtues of Place

by Jack R. Baker and Jeffrey Bilbro foreword by Wendell Berry

Prominent author and cultural critic Wendell Berry is well known for his contributions to agrarianism and environmentalism, but his commentary on education has received comparatively little attention.

Sabers through the Reich: World War II Corps Cavalry from Normandy to the Elbe

by William Stuart Nance foreword by Robert M. Citino

Before the Allies landed on the beaches of Normandy in June 1944, their aerial reconnaissance discovered signs of German defenses on the Îles St. Marcouf.

He's Got Rhythm: The Life and Career of Gene Kelly

by Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

He sang and danced in the rain, proclaimed New York to be a wonderful town, and convinced a group of Parisian children that they had rhythm.

Improvising Out Loud: My Life Teaching Hollywood How to Act

by Jeff Corey with Emily Corey foreword by Leonard Nimoy afterword by Janet Neipris

Jeff Corey (1914–2002) made a name for himself in the 1940s as a character actor in films like Superman and the Mole Men (1951), Joan of Arc (1948), and The Killers (1946). Everything changed in 1951, when he was summoned before the House Un-American Activities Committee.

Dalton Trumbo: Blacklisted Hollywood Radical

by Larry Ceplair and Christopher Trumbo

James Dalton Trumbo (1905–1976) is widely recognized for his work as a screenwriter, playwright, and author, but he is also remembered as one of the Hollywood Ten who opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee.

US Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton

edited by Andrew Johnstone and Andrew Priest with contributions by Andrew Johnstone, Andrew Priest, J. Simon Rofe, Michael F. Hopkins, Steven Casey, Scott Lucas, Sylvia Ellis, Thomas Tunstall Allcock, Sandra Scanlon, Thomas Alan Schwartz, Andrew Priest, Robert Mason, David Ryan, Robert A. Strong, Richard B. Schwartz, and Robert David Johnson

While domestic issues loom large in voters’ minds during American presidential elections, matters of foreign policy have consistently shaped candidates and their campaigns.

Charles Walters: The Director Who Made Hollywood Dance

by Brent Phillips

From the trolley scene in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’s last dance on the silver screen (The Barkleys of Broadway, 1949) to Judy Garland’s timeless, tuxedo-clad performance of “Get Happy” (Summer Stock, 1950), Charles Walters staged the iconic musical sequences of Hollywood’s golden age.

Harry Langdon: King of Silent Comedy

by Gabriella Oldham and Mabel Langdon foreword by Harry Langdon Jr.

Among silent film comedians, three names stand out—Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd—but Harry Langdon indisputably deserves to sit among them as the fourth “king.” In films such as The Strong Man (1926) and Long Pants (1927), Langdon parlayed his pantomime talents, expressive eyes, and childlike innocence into silent-era stardom.

Ranger: A Soldier's Life

by Colonel Ralph Puckett, USA (Ret.) with D. K. R. Crosswell afterword by General David H. Petraeus, USA (Ret.)

On November 25, 1950, during one of the toughest battles of the Korean War, the US Eighth Army Ranger Company seized and held the strategically important Hill 205 overlooking the Chongchon River.

Integrated: The Lincoln Institute, Basketball, and a Vanished Tradition

by James W. Miller

In Integrated, James W. Miller explores an often ignored aspect of America’s struggle for racial equality.

Kentucky Heirloom Seeds: Growing, Eating, Saving

by Bill Best with Dobree Adams foreword by A. Gwynn Henderson afterword by Brook Elliott

Saving seeds to plant for next year’s crop has been key to survival around the globe for millennia.

Blackberries, Blackberries

by Crystal Wilkinson foreword by Nikky Finney afterword by Honorée Jeffers

As the title implies, this beautifully written collection bursts with stories reminiscent of blackberries-–-small, succulent morsels that are inviting and sweet, yet sometimes bitter.

Water Street

by Crystal Wilkinson foreword by Jacinda Townsend afterword by Marianne Worthington

The residents of Water Street are hardworking, God-fearing people who live in a seemingly safe and insulated neighborhood within a small Kentucky town: “Water Street is a place where mothers can turn their backs to flip a pancake or cornmeal hoecake on the stove and know our children are safe.

A Rape in the Early Republic: Gender and Legal Culture in an 1806 Virginia Trial

by Alexander Smyth edited by Randal L. Hall

On January 14, 1806, Sidney Hanson was raped by John Deskins on a rough gravel path in the woods in Tazewell County, Virginia.

Crane: Sex, Celebrity, and My Father's Unsolved Murder

by Robert Crane and Christopher Fryer

On June 29, 1978, Bob Crane, known to Hogan’s Heroes fans as Colonel Hogan, was discovered brutally murdered in his Scottsdale, Arizona, apartment.

The Life and Work of John C. Campbell

by Olive Dame Campbell edited by Elizabeth M. Williams

John C. Campbell (1867–1919) is widely considered to be a pioneer in the objective study of the complex world of Appalachian mountaineers.

The Price of Scarlet: Poems

by Brianna Noll

A honeycomb long vacated by honeybees still possesses an “echo of the swarm, / a lingering song.

Mammoth Cave Curiosities: A Guide to Rockphobia, Dating, Saber-toothed Cats, and Other Subterranean Marvels

by Colleen O'Connor Olson

Sir Elton John, blind fish, the original Twinkie, President Ronald Reagan’s Secret Service detail, and mummies don’t usually come up in the same conversation—unless you’re at Mammoth Cave National Park!

Black Greek-letter Organizations in the Twenty-First Century: Our Fight Has Just Begun

edited by Gregory S. Parks foreword by Julianne Malveaux and Marc Morial

During the twentieth century, black Greek-Letter organizations (BGLOs) united college students dedicated to excellence, fostered kinship, and uplifted African Americans.

Nixon’s Back Channel to Moscow: Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

by Richard A. Moss foreword by Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

Most Americans consider détente—the reduction of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union—to be among the Nixon administration’s most significant foreign policy successes.

Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods, revised edition

by Aimee Zaring

Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands.

Alpha Phi Alpha: A Legacy of Greatness, the Demands of Transcendence

edited by Gregory S. Parks and Stefan M. Bradley foreword by Michael A. Blake

On December 4, 1906, on Cornell University’s campus, seven black men founded one of the greatest and most enduring organizations in American history.

Foreign Policy at the Periphery: The Shifting Margins of US International Relations since World War II

edited by Bevan Sewell and Maria Ryan

As American interests assumed global proportions after 1945, policy makers were faced with the challenge of prioritizing various regions and determining the extent to which the United States was prepared to defend and support them.

Faith in Black Power: Religion, Race, and Resistance in Cairo, Illinois

by Kerry Pimblott

In 1969, nineteen-year-old Robert Hunt was found dead in the Cairo, Illinois, police station.

My Life in Focus: A Photographer’s Journey with Elizabeth Taylor and the Hollywood Jet Set

by Gianni Bozzacchi with Joey Tayler

When Gianni Bozzacchi accepted an assignment as a photographer on the set of The Comedians (1967), he didn’t know that his life was about to change forever.

Selma to Saigon: The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War

by Daniel S. Lucks

The civil rights and anti–Vietnam War movements were the two greatest protests of twentieth-century America.

Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic

by James P. Cousins

Outspoken New England urbanite Horace Holley (1781–1827) was an unlikely choice to become the president of Transylvania University—the first college established west of the Allegheny Mountains.

Religion and Resistance in Appalachia: Faith and the Fight against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining

by Joseph D. Witt

In the last fifty years, the Appalachian Mountains have suffered permanent and profound change due to the expansion of surface coal mining.

Writing the Legal Record: Law Reporters in Nineteenth-Century Kentucky

by Kurt X. Metzmeier

Any student of American history knows of Washington, Jefferson, and the other statesmen who penned the documents that form the legal foundations of our nation, but many other great minds contributed to the development of the young republic’s judicial system—figures such as William Littell, Ben Monroe, and John J. Marshall.

Catherine Spalding, SCN: A Life in Letters

by Mary Ellen Doyle, SCN

At the age of nineteen, Catherine Spalding (1793–1858) ventured into what would become a lifetime of leadership with the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth (SCN)—one of the most significant American religious communities for women.

Willis Duke Weatherford: Race, Religion, and Reform in the American South

by Andrew McNeill Canady

At the turn of the twentieth century, few white, southern leaders would speak out in favor of racial equality for fear of being dismissed as too progressive.

Stoner's Boy: A Seckatary Hawkins Mystery

by Robert F. Schulkers introduction by Randy Schulkers and Diane Schneider

Mr. Stoner is bad, and it seems his son is turning out just the same.

A Political Companion to Marilynne Robinson

edited by Shannon L. Mariotti and Joseph H. Lane Jr.

Marilynne Robinson is arguably one of the most important writers of our time.

Hollywood Divided: The 1950 Screen Directors Guild Meeting and the Impact of the Blacklist

by Kevin Brianton

On October 22, 1950, the Screen Directors Guild (SDG) gathered for a meeting at the opulent Beverly Hills Hotel.

Religion and Sustainable Agriculture: World Spiritual Traditions and Food Ethics

edited by Todd LeVasseur, Pramod Parajuli, and Norman Wirzba foreword by Vandana Shiva

Distinct practices of eating are at the heart of many of the world’s faith traditions—from the Christian Eucharist to Muslim customs of fasting during Ramadan to the vegetarianism and asceticism practiced by some followers of Hinduism and Buddhism.

Showman of the Screen: Joseph E. Levine and His Revolutions in Film Promotion

by A. T. McKenna

Short, immaculately dressed, and shockingly foul-mouthed, Joseph E. Levine (1905–1987) was larger than life.

The Gray Ghost: A Seckatary Hawkins Mystery

by Robert F. Schulkers introduction by Randy Schulkers and Diane Schneider

Everyone thought Stoner’s Boy was dead.

Amphibians and Reptiles of Land Between the Lakes

by David H. Snyder, A. Floyd Scott, Edmund J. Zimmerer, and David F. Frymire

Known for its natural beauty, Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area is the largest inland peninsula in the United States.

Japan after 3/11: Global Perspectives on the Earthquake, Tsunami, and Fukushima Meltdown

edited by Pradyumna P. Karan and Unryu Suganuma

On March 11, 2011, an underwater earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku, Japan, triggered one of the most devastating tsunamis of a generation.

Kentucky and the Great War: World War I on the Home Front

by David J. Bettez

From five thousand children marching in a parade, singing, “Johnnie get your hoe.

Kentucky Rebel Town: The Civil War Battles of Cynthiana and Harrison County

by William A. Penn

On April 22, 1861, within weeks of the surrender at Fort Sumter, fresh recruits marched to the Cynthiana, Kentucky, depot—one of the state’s first volunteer companies to join the Confederate army.

Kentucky Marine: Major General Logan Feland and the Making of the Modern USMC

by David J. Bettez

A native of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, Major General Logan Feland (1869–1936) played a major role in the development of the modern Marine Corps.

The Origins of the Grand Alliance: Anglo-American Military Collaboration from the Panay Incident to Pearl Harbor

by William T. Johnsen

On December 12, 1937, Japanese aircraft sank the American gunboat Panay, which was anchored in the Yangtze River outside Nanjing, China.

Tales from Kentucky One-Room School Teachers

by William Lynwood Montell

In an educational era defined by large school campuses and overcrowded classrooms, it is easy to overlook the era of one-room schools, when teachers filled every role, including janitor, and provided a familylike atmosphere in which children also learned from one another.

Tales from Tennessee Lawyers

by William Lynwood Montell

Perhaps no one has keener insight into human nature than the small-town trial lawyer.

Madam Belle: Sex, Money, and Influence in a Southern Brothel

by Maryjean Wall

Belle Brezing made a major career move when she stepped off the streets of Lexington, Kentucky, and into Jennie Hill’s bawdy house—an upscale brothel run out of a former residence of Mary Todd Lincoln.

Hitler’s Wehrmacht, 1935–1945

by Rolf-Dieter Müller translated by Janice W. Ancker

Since the end of World War II, Germans have struggled with the legacy of the Wehrmacht—the unified armed forces mobilized by Adolf Hitler in 1935 to ensure the domination of the Third Reich in perpetuity.

Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide, second edition

by Susan Reigler photographs by Pam Spaulding and Carol Peachee

Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky’s bourbon country.

More Kentucky Bourbon Cocktails

by Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler photographs by Jessica Ebelhar

Ninety-five percent of the world’s bourbon whiskey is produced in Kentucky, and the drink is as distinctive to the state as Thoroughbred horses and Bluegrass music.

Tales from Kentucky Lawyers

by William Lynwood Montell

“A woman was sitting on the witness stand, and the lawyer asked her, ‘Did you, or did you not, on the night of June 23rd have sex with a hippie on the back of a motorcycle in a peach orchard?

Tales from Kentucky Doctors

by William Lynwood Montell

The nearly 350 humorous, heartwarming, and sometimes tragic accounts presented in William Lynwood Montell’s latest book, Tales from Kentucky Doctors, offer an unusual perspective on the culture and tradition of Kentucky health-care practice.

Tales of Kentucky Ghosts

by William Lynwood Montell

A good ghost story can make your hair stand on end, your palms sweat, and your heart race.

Tales from Kentucky Funeral Homes

by William Lynwood Montell

In Tales from Kentucky Funeral Homes, William Lynwood Montell has collected stories and reminiscences from funeral home directors and embalmers across the state.

Tales from Kentucky Sheriffs

by William Lynwood Montell

Following the success of his collections of stories from funeral directors, schoolteachers, doctors, and lawyers, folklorist William Lynwood Montell presents a new volume of tales from Kentucky sheriffs.

Tales from Kentucky Nurses

by William Lynwood Montell

From frontier times to the present day, Kentucky nurses have served with intelligence and energy, always ensuring that their patients received the best available care.

Why Air Forces Fail: The Anatomy of Defeat, revised and expanded edition

edited by Robin Higham and Stephen J. Harris

Since the publication of the first edition of Why Air Forces Fail, the debate over airpower’s role in military operations has only intensified.

North Korea and the World: Human Rights, Arms Control, and Strategies for Negotiation

by Walter C. Clemens Jr.

With nearly twenty-five million citizens, a secretive totalitarian dictatorship, and active nuclear and ballistic missile weapons programs, North Korea presents some of the world’s most difficult foreign policy challenges.

Adorno and Democracy: The American Years

by Shannon L. Mariotti

German philosopher and social critic Theodor Adorno (1903–1969) is widely regarded as one of the twentieth century’s most influential thinkers.

The Civil War on the Mississippi : Union Sailors, Gunboat Captains, and the Campaign to Control the River

by Barbara Brooks Tomblin

Flowing from its source in northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, the Mississippi River borders or passes through ten different states and serves as one of the most important transportation systems in the United States.

Aid Under Fire: Nation Building and the Vietnam War

by Jessica Elkind

In the aftermath of World War II, as longstanding empires collapsed and former colonies struggled for independence, the United States employed new diplomatic tools to counter unprecedented challenges to its interests across the globe.

Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action, and the Origins of the Second Indochina War

by William J. Rust

Although most Americans paid little attention to Cambodia during Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency, the nation’s proximity to China and the global ideological struggle with the Soviet Union guaranteed US vigilance throughout Southeast Asia.

Battlefield Surgeon: Life and Death on the Front Lines of World War II

by Paul A. Kennedy edited by Christopher B. Kennedy foreword by Rick Atkinson and afterword by John T. Greenwood

In November 1942, Paul Andrew Kennedy (1912–1993) boarded the St. Elena in New York Harbor and sailed for Casablanca as part of Operation Torch, the massive Allied invasion of North Africa.

China’s Encounter with Global Hollywood: Cultural Policy and the Film Industry, 1994-2013

by Wendy Su

In recent years, the film industry in the People’s Republic of China has found itself among the top three most prolific in the world.

The Reluctant Film Art of Woody Allen, second edition

by Peter J. Bailey

For five decades, no American filmmaker has been as prolific—or as paradoxical—as Woody Allen.

Lincoln before Lincoln: Early Cinematic Adaptations of the Life of America’s Greatest President

by Brian J. Snee

Remembered as the Savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln is one of America’s most revered presidents.

Dangerous Doctrine: How Obama's Grand Strategy Weakened America

by Robert G. Kaufman

Much like Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, President Barack Obama came to office as a politician who emphasized conviction rather than consensus.

Building a Healthy Economy from the Bottom Up: Harnessing Real-World Experience for Transformative Change

by Anthony Flaccavento foreword by Bill McKibben

The global economy has witnessed important changes in recent years.

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South

by Sergio A. Lussana

Trapped in a world of brutal physical punishment and unremitting, back-breaking labor, Frederick Douglass mused that it was the friendships he shared with other enslaved men that carried him through his darkest days.

The Notorious John Morrissey: How a Bare-Knuckle Brawler Became a Congressman and Founded Saratoga Race Course

by James C. Nicholson

An Irish immigrant, a collection agent for crime bosses, a professional boxer, and a prodigious gambler, John Morrissey was—if nothing else—an unlikely candidate to become one of the most important figures in the history of Thoroughbred racing.

A Simple Freedom: The Strong Mind of Robben Island Prisoner No. 468/64

by Ahmed Kathrada with Tim Couzens introduction by Nelson Mandela

In June 1964, South Africa’s most visible antiapartheid activists were sentenced to life in prison in the infamous Rivonia Trial.

Alben Barkley: A Life in Politics

by James K. Libbey

Born to poor tenant farmers in a log cabin in Graves County, Kentucky, Alben Barkley (1877–1956) rose to achieve a national political stature equaled by few of his contemporaries.

The Arthurdale Community School: Education and Reform in Depression Era Appalachia

by Sam F. Stack Jr.

The first of many homestead communities designed during the rollout of the New Deal, Arthurdale, West Virginia, was a bold experiment in progressive social planning.

Veit Harlan: The Life and Work of a Nazi Filmmaker

by Frank Noack

Veit Harlan (1899–1964) was one of Germany’s most controversial and loathed directors.

Inside Israel's Northern Command: The Yom Kippur War on the Syrian Border

edited by Brigadier General Dani Asher, IDF (Ret.) with contributions by Yitzhak Hofi, Uri Simchoni, Avraham Bar David, and Hagai Mann

On October 6, 1973, Israel’s Northern Command was surprised by the thunder of cannon fire and the sight of dense, black smoke.

A Life for Freedom: The Mission to End Racial Injustice in South Africa

by Denis Goldberg foreword by Z. Pallo Jordan

From June 1963 to October 1964, ten antiapartheid activists were tried at South Africa’s Pretoria Supreme Court.

The Historic Kentucky Kitchen: Traditional Recipes for Today's Cook

by Deirdre A. Scaggs and Andrew W. McGraw foreword by John van Willigen

Kitchens serve as more than a place to prepare food; they are cornerstones of the home and family.

Scissors, Paper, Rock: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Along with his siblings, Raphael Hardin left his childhood home in rural Kentucky.

Enemies to Allies: Cold War Germany and American Memory

by Brian C. Etheridge

At the close of World War II, the United States went from being allied with the Soviet Union against Germany to alignment with the Germans against the Soviet Union—almost overnight.

The Man Who Loved Birds: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Having taken great risks—to immigrate to America, to take monastic vows—Bengali physician Meena Chatterjee and Brother Flavian are each seeking safety and security when they encounter Johnny Faye, a Vietnam vet, free spirit, and expert marijuana farmer.

Crossing the River: A Novel

by Fenton Johnson

Make no mistake: Martha Bragg Picket is a headstrong southern woman with a rebellious spirit, a characteristic her son Michael shares.

American Justice in Taiwan: The 1957 Riots and Cold War Foreign Policy

by Stephen G. Craft

On May 23, 1957, US Army Sergeant Robert Reynolds was acquitted of murdering Chinese officer Liu Ziran in Taiwan.

Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply

by Vandana Shiva

For the farmer, the seed is not merely the source of future plants and food; it is a vehicle through which culture and history can be preserved and spread to future generations.

The Violence of the Green Revolution: Third World Agriculture, Ecology, and Politics

by Vandana Shiva

The Green Revolution has been heralded as a political and technological achievement—unprecedented in human history.

Burley: Kentucky Tobacco in a New Century

by Ann K. Ferrell

Once iconic American symbols, tobacco farms are gradually disappearing.

Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains

by Mike Norris illustrated by Minnie Adkins

Playing hopscotch in the schoolyard or hide-and-seek in the woods, Appalachian children once recited traditional nursery rhymes from memory.

The Political Thought of Henry David Thoreau: Privatism and the Practice of Philosophy

by Jonathan McKenzie

Today, Henry David Thoreau’s status as one of America’s most influential public intellectuals remains unchallenged.

In Peace and Freedom: My Journey in Selma

by Bernard LaFayette Jr. and Kathryn Lee Johnson foreword by Congressman John Robert Lewis afterword by Raymond Arsenault

Bernard LaFayette Jr. (b. 1940) was a cofounder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a leader in the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins, a Freedom Rider, an associate of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and the national coordinator of the Poor People’s Campaign.

Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America’s First Undeclared War

by Larry Blomstedt

Three days after North Korean premier Kim Il Sung launched a massive military invasion of South Korea on June 24, 1950, President Harry S. Truman responded, dispatching air and naval support to South Korea.

Virtual Afterlives: Grieving the Dead in the Twenty-First Century

by Candi K. Cann

For millennia, the rituals of death and remembrance have been fixed by time and location, but in the twenty-first century, grieving has become a virtual phenomenon.

Northern Kentucky University: A Panoramic History

photographs by Thomas R. Schiff with contributions by W. Michael Ryan, James C. Claypool, Tom Zaniello, Robert K. Wallace, Carole Beere, and Gail Wells

Northern Kentucky University’s evolution from an educational branch of the University of Kentucky into a major university in its own right is a tale of promise and humble beginnings.