Newly Released Titles

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For the Hog Killing, 1979

by Tanya Amyx Berry Essay by Wendell Berry edited by Ben Aguilar

“The traditional neighborly work of killing a hog and preparing it as food for humans is either a fine art or a shameful mess.

Film's First Family: The Untold Story of the Costellos

by Terry Chester Shulman

Scandal, adultery, secret marriages, celebrity, divorce, custody battles, suicide attempts, and alcoholism—the trials and tribulations of the Costellos were as riveting as any Hollywood feature film.

Hollywood at the Races: Film's Love Affair with the Turf

by Alan Shuback

Horse racing was so popular and influential between 1930 and 1960 that nearly 150 racing themed films were released, including A Day at the Races, Thoroughbreds Don’t Cry, and National Velvet.

The eQuality Toolkit: Practical Skills for LGBTQ and DSD-Affected Patient Care

by Laura Weingartner, Emily Noonan, Amy Holthouser, Jennifer Potter, Stacie Steinbock, Suzanne Kingery, and Susan Sawning

Every individual is entitled to quality health care, but medical professionals are not always equipped with the training and knowledge to provide the necessary care to patients—especially when it comes to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities and individuals with differences of sex development (DSD). For this reason, the University of Louisville School of Medicine established eQuality (www.louisville.edu/medicine/equality/), an inclusive LGBTQ/DSD-affected health training program that was integrated across the medical student curriculum.

Bourbon's Backroads: A Journey through Kentucky's Distilling Landscape

by Karl Raitz

With more than fifty distilleries in the state, bourbon is as synonymous with Kentucky as horses and basketball.

The Quare Women: A Story of the Kentucky Mountains

by Lucy Furman foreword by Rebecca Gayle Howell

When Katherine Pettit and May Stone arrived in the rural Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky to engage in social settlement work in the late 1800s, they were unmarried outsiders, living in pitched tents on the side of a hill, and perceived as odd, peculiar—and “quare” (the local pronunciation of “queer”). Yet these strong, capable educators wanted to “learn all we can and teach all we can,” and in doing so would persevere to establish the Hindman Settlement School in 1902.

Coach Hall: My Life On and Off the Court

by Joe B. Hall with Marianne Walker foreword by Rick Bozich

Until I was nine or ten, everyone called me Joe or Joe Hall.

Boy on the Bridge: The Story of John Shalikashvili's American Success

by Andrew Marble

His life and career were the embodiment of the American dream.

Edward M. Almond and the US Army: From the 92nd Infantry Division to the X Corps

by Michael E. Lynch

This study presents a comprehensive look at a complex man who exhibited an unfaltering commitment to the military and to his soldiers but whose career was marked by controversy.

A Careful Hunger: Poems

by Judy Young edited by John K. Young foreword by Mary Ann Taylor-Hall and Susan Starr Richards

Judy Young (1940–2015) was a gifted but private poet.

Stitched Together: Stories of a Kentucky Life

by Bob Thompson

When Bob Thompson asked his granny years ago why she continued to create so many of her beautiful quilts, she said it was the only way she could reach across time, touching and giving her descendants her energy.

Enid Yandell: Kentucky's Pioneer Sculptor

by Juilee Decker

Louisville-born and nationally renowned sculptor Enid Yandell (1869–1934) was ahead of her time.

Kentucky and the Great War: World War I on the Home Front

by David J. Bettez

From five thousand children marching in a parade, singing, “Johnnie get your hoe.

Willis Duke Weatherford: Race, Religion, and Reform in the American South

by Andrew McNeill Canady

At the turn of the twentieth century, few white, southern leaders would speak out in favor of racial equality for fear of being dismissed as too progressive.

Wonderful Wasteland and other natural disasters: Poems

by Elidio La Torre Lagares

When Hurricane María unleashed its devastation onto Puerto Rico, thousands of lives were lost to the storm in what was the island’s worst natural disaster on record.

Blood, Guts, and Grease: George S. Patton in World War I

by Jon B. Mikolashek foreword by Paul T. Mikolashek

George S. Patton is one of the most controversial, celebrated, and popular military leaders in American history, and his accomplishments and victories have been greatly documented.

Faith in Black Power: Religion, Race, and Resistance in Cairo, Illinois

by Kerry Pimblott

In 1969, nineteen-year-old Robert Hunt was found dead in the Cairo, Illinois, police station.

The Dream Is Lost: Voting Rights and the Politics of Race in Richmond, Virginia

by Julian Maxwell Hayter

Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history.

Spectacular Bid: The Last Superhorse of the Twentieth Century

by Peter Lee

A safety pin was all that kept Spectacular Bid from becoming the eleventh Thoroughbred to take the Triple Crown.

Changing the World One Book at a Time

by James W. Parkinson

The education system is in crisis.

Building Ho's Army: Chinese Military Assistance to North Vietnam

by Xiaobing Li

Built upon a solid foundation of sources, memoirs, and interviews, this study sheds new light on China’s efforts in the Vietnam War.

Engineering Corporate Success: A Memoir

by James Hardymon edited by Terry Birdwhistell

From growing up on the banks of the Ohio River during the Great Depression to acquiring executive management roles at large international companies, James Hardymon’s life has been full of twists, turns, hard work, and achievement.

Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage: Two Hundred Years of Southern Cuisine and Culture

by John van Willigen

Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place.

Conversations with Legendary Television Stars: Interviews from the First Fifty Years

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

During television’s first fifty years—long before cable networks, Hulu, Netflix, and the like—families would gather around their television sets nightly to watch entertaining shows such as I Love Lucy, Gunsmoke, M*A*S*H, The Beverly Hillbillies, Fantasy Island, and The Rockford Files.

The Legacy of J. William Fulbright: Policy, Power, and Ideology

edited by Alessandro Brogi, Giles Scott-Smith, and David J. Snyder with contributions by Randall B. Woods, Neal Allen, Frédérick Gagnon, Benjamin Brady, David L. Prentice, Justin Hart, Sam Lebovic, Lonnie Johnson, Molly Bettie, Alice Garner, Diane Kirkby, Hannah Higgin, Carla Konta, and Guanqui Xu

This insightful collection of essays details the political life of one of the most prominent and gifted American statesmen of the twentieth century.