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Perspectives On Irish Nationalism

edited by Thomas E. Hachey and Lawrence J. McCaffrey

Availableweb pdf$25.00x 978-0-8131-4901-1
Availablepaperback$25.00x 978-0-8131-0188-0
Out of Printcloth$29.95s 978-0-8131-1665-5
172 pages  Pubdate: 07/11/2014  6 x 9  

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Perspectives on Irish Nationalism examines the cultural, political, religious, economic, linguistic, folklore, and historical dimensions of the phenomenon of Irish nationalism. Its essayists are among the most distinguished Irish studies scholars. Their essays include a comprehensive analysis of the tapestry of Irish nationalism and focused studies that often challenge myths, pieties, and the scholarly consensus. Thomas E. Hachey is Professor of Irish, Irish-American, and British history and Chair of the department at Marquette University. He wrote Britain and Irish Separatism: From the Fenians to the Free State 1807-1922 (1977), coauthored and edited The Problem of Partition: Peril to World Peace (1972); coedited Voices of Revolution: Rebels and Rhetoric (1972), and edited Anglo-Vatican Relations, 1919-1937: Confidential Annual Reports of the British Ministers to the Holy See and Confidential Dispatches: Analyses of American by the British Ambassador, 1939-45 (1974). Lawrence J. McCaffrey is Professor of Irish and Irish-American History at Loyola University of Chicago. He has published a number of articles and books, including Daniel O'Connell and the Repeal Year (1966), The Irish Question, 1800-1922 (1968), The Irish Diaspora in America (1976) and coauthored The Irish in Chicago (1987). "

An exceptionally rich exploration of the complex Irish national experience...highly recommended for colleges and the adult reading public. -- History

Very provocative, well written, and informed...an invaluable book for anyone interested in contemporary Irish society, not simply because it is one of the few books that devotes itself wholly to examining the question of Irish nationalism, but because many of the essays help to clarify and put into perspective this very ambiguous and volatile concept. -- The Irish Edition